Roberto Rossellini – Cartesius (1974)

Rossellini, 1973: One makes films in order to become a better human being.
The New York Times, : Just watching Rossellini’s magnificent work may help a bit in that department as well.

In the final phase of his career, Italian master Roberto Rossellini embarked on a dramatic, daunting project: a series of television films about knowledge and history, made in an effort to teach, where contemporary media were failing. Looking at the Western world’s major figures and moments, yet focusing on the small details of daily life, Rossellini was determined not to recount history but to relive it, as it might have been, unadorned and full of the drama of the everyday. This selection of Rossellini’s history films presents The Age of the Medici, Cartesius and Blaise Pascal – works that don’t just enliven the past but illuminate the ideas that have brought us to where we are today. Read More »

Elia Kazan – Splendor in the Grass (1961)

Quote:
It’s 1928 in oil rich southeast Kansas. High school seniors Bud Stamper and Deanie Loomis are in love with each other. Bud, the popular football captain, and Deanie, the sensitive soul, are “good” kids who have only gone as far as kissing. Unspoken to each other, they expect to get married to each other one day. But both face pressures within the relationship, Bud who has the urges to go farther despite knowing in his heart that if they do that Deanie will end up with a reputation like his own sister, Ginny Stamper, known as the loose, immoral party girl, and Deanie who will do anything to hold onto Bud regardless of the consequences. They also face pressures from their parents who have their own expectation for their offspring. Bud’s overbearing father, Ace Stamper, the local oil baron, does not believe Bud can do wrong and expects him to go to Yale after graduation, which does not fit within Bud’s own expectations for himself. And the money and image conscious Mrs. Loomis just wants Deanie to get married as soon as possible to Bud so that Deanie will have a prosperous life in a rich family. When Bud makes a unilateral decision under these pressures, it leads to a path which affects both his and Deanie’s future. Read More »

Ryûtarô Nakagawa – Hashire, zetsubô ni oitsukarenai hayasa de AKA Tokyo Sunrise (2015)

Quote:
‘Tokyo Sunrise’ presents a young man’s journey to face an incomprehensible death of his best friend. Read More »

Jonás Trueba – La virgen de agosto AKA The August Virgin (2019)

Quote:
Eva is not satisfied with her life. In an act of faith, she decides to stay in Madrid over the summer, when all the other locals leave. August offers her a chance to start from scratch. Read More »

Shimako Sato – K-20: Kaijin niju menso den AKA K-20: Legend of the Mask (2008)

Imdb:
Holy Steampunk, Sherlock Holmes! Screen idol Takeshi Kaneshiro is back and this time hes showing his respect for Lupin, Raffles and all the great thieves and masked penny dreadful heroes of the turn-of-the-century in this massive steampunk blow-out directed by Shimako Sato, one of the few female directors in the big budget end of the Japanese film industry. Read More »

Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani – Santos Palace (2006)

Synopsis:
Sultry courtship display between a waitress and customer in a café.

At nine o’clock in the morning, the Santos Palace coffee bar opens its doors. The waitress pours her first cup of coffee for an unknown elderly man. They circle each other a little, in a kind of sultry courtship display. When the other, younger waitress arrives, jealousy ensues. Read More »

Ferdinand Khittl – Die Parallelstrasse AKA The Parallel Street (1962)

Die Parallelstraße is one of the most mysterious pioneer films of the New German Cinema. It was produced by GBF, a production company for innovative industrial and promotional films and received awards in inter national film festivals. French critic Robert Benayoun called it “a philosophical thriller, a western of meditation which compensates for a whole year of inevitable manifestations of stupidity,” Jacques Rivette put it on his list of the most important films of 1968. The DVD presents for the very first time this “unjustly forgotten masterpiece of the New German Cinema” (Martin Brady) as well as several rare shorts by Ferdinand Khittl (1924-1976) which show his talent for innovative film experiments. Read More »