Doris Wishman – Diary of a Nudist (1961)

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From Imdb:

Quite honestly, this film is crap. It’s laughably written, woodenly acted, badly filmed and dubbed, and contains only a wisp of a plot. It’s also pretty boring. And yet, I couldn’t look away! Must have been the wall-to-wall nudity, the whole raison d’etre of this turkey.

It’s quite refreshing to see so many beautiful naked women circa 1961. There’s no silicone to be found, and these women look happy, healthy and well tanned. Watching them cavort for the length of this movie is a pleasure, but it’s the only pleasure you’ll get out of this lame duck.

The nudity must have been racy in its day, but today it’s strictly PG. There’s plenty of breasts and buttocks, both male and female, but none of the nasty bits. In fact, all the nudists either cover their genitalia with some object – a newspaper, a towel – or, they deliberately turn their hips away from the camera as they walk by. At one point there’s a volleyball game taking place: the team with their backs to the camera is completely nude, but the team facing it are all wearing swimsuit bottoms. It’s pretty silly stuff, but the charm lies in seeing such an abundant display of T&A in such an old film. Continue reading

Grzegorz Królikiewicz – Na wylot AKA Through and Through (1973)

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Quote:
“Through and Through” is a legendary feature focusing on radicalization of cinematic language. The film transgresses traditional methods of narrative construction, which is characteristic of its genre. This non-conentional treatment of the cinematic form places this film somewhere between experimental art and cinema, in a domain that does not properly belong to either field. Krolikiewicz’s radical debut is representative of his parallel pursuits – as a filmmaker as well as film theorist – and employs his crucial theory of “out – of – frame cinematographic space.” The first film in his trilogy (together with Dancing Hawk and Endless Claims), which portray typical Polish anti-heroes imprisoned by reality, “Through and Through” criticizes the nihilism and depravity created by the socio-political system. Continue reading

Nae Caranfil – Filantropica AKA Philanthropy (2002)

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ALLMOVIE:
Nae Caranfil’s Filantropica (Philanthropy) is a comedy about a man attempting to live beyond his means. Ovidiu (Mircea Diaconu) is a teacher and struggling writer who still resides with his parents. He falls in love with Diana (Viorica Voda), the sister of one of his students. In order to impress her he agrees to a scam thought up by the roguish Pepe (Gheorghe Dinica). The scam involves Ovidiu pretending to be married to Miruna (Mara Nicolescu). — Perry Seibert

IMDB:
Charity Theme Too Close to Home, 25 January 2003
Author: (sjwegg@sympatico.ca) from St. Catahrines, Ontario

Director Nae Caranfil wasn’t short of Romanian anecdotes and stories before the screening of his fourth feature film when I saw it at the Palm Springs International Film Festival: Q: What’s the difference between a Romania pessimist and optimist; A: “The pessimist says, ‘Things couldn’t possibly get worse;’ the optimist says ‘Oh yes they can.'” And when those attending revealed their knowledge of his native country was confined to the birthplace of Dracula, we were assured, with a knowing grin, that the film to follow would be “a dark, hopeless, miserable comedy.” Well, three out of four isn’t bad! Continue reading

Joanna Hogg – Exhibition (2013)

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Synopsis(bfi)
Joanna Hogg (Unrelated, Archipelago) brings her distinctly minimalist brand of comedy into the ultra-modernist home of artists D and H. This troubled but brave-faced couple have decided to sell their much-loved apartment, but as the sale begins to inch ever closer to reality, submerged anxieties, resentments and second-thoughts spring to the surface.
Starring Viv Albertine, guitarist of influential punk group The Slits, and Turner-prize-nominated artist Liam Gillick, Exhibition is as sleekly designed and uncompromisingly arch as the house itself – the film’s commanding central character. It’s also a deftly observed comment on the uncontrollable property obsession that characterises modern Britain. Continue reading

Roger Vadim – Barbarella (1968)

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Sexy Barbarella roams 41st-century space with her blind guardian angel, Pygar. Directed by Roger Vadim; actors Jane Fonda, John Law, Anita Pallenberg, Milo O’Shea, David Hemmings, Marcel Marceau, Claude Dauphin

In this notorious film version of the popular French comic strip by Jean-Claude Forest, Jane Fonda plays a sexy yet innocent space-age heroine in the year 40,000 A.D. who never gets herself into a situation that requires too much clothing. BARBARELLA opens with the titular heroine stripping down to nothing in zero gravity among strategically placed credits. From there Barbarella embarks on a mission to find a peace-threatening young scientist named Duran Duran (Milo O’Shea) by order of the president of Earth. En route, she’s attacked by killer dolls, is strapped into a contraption known as the Excessive Machine, and falls in love with a blind angel. Continue reading