Robin Spry – Prologue (1970)


One critic described this film as an “immensely appealing and articulate exploration of the world of the drop-out, which makes almost everything else in the recent spate of films about hippydom seem adolescent.” Prologue concerns a young Montrealer who edits an underground newspaper. He and his female companion are joined by a young draft dodger from the United States. In the choices they make, the two rival philosophies of dissenting youth become evident: militant protest or communal retreat.

The film includes some of the bloody rioting in Chicago during the 1968 Democratic Convention. Also seen and heard in the film is anti-war and civil rights spokesman Abbie Hoffman.

Robin Spry was one of the brightest talents of the late sixties and early seventies and a pioneer of the emerging English-Canadian film scene of that era. Equally adept at documentary and fiction and gifted with a keen eye for social analysis, his films often dealt with contemporary social issues and were continually concerned with the politics of power.


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