Eduardo Williams – El auge del humano AKA The Human Surge (2016)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Quote:
A 3-country observation of the millenials in Argentina, Mozambique, and the Philippines.





Leo Goldsmith for Cinema Scope wrote:
Williams’ cinema is one of vectors: across borders, networks, and states of being. These routes are not simply migrations, although social, economic, and geographical impermanence is certainly central to his logistical mapping of his young characters’ lives. Rather, Williams’ films follow a system of intersecting lines and pathways that carry us beyond the mundane surface of reality to other places entirely.Full





Nick Pinkerton for Artforum wrote:
Williams endeavors to pass through the wiring of intricate networks in the case of both the internet and the anthill. The casual air disguises The Human Surge’s thematic coherency, beginning with the title’s invocation of organic-technological hybridity, as echoed in the analog-to-digital progression of its format shift, or in a moment where a child is heard measuring the human genome in gigabytes. While precious few filmmakers have seriously attempted to address the enormous cognitive earthquake represented by the internet’s colonization of daily life, Williams dares and is actually up for the challenge. From an interview last year:

“My brain and practice have been transformed by technology. For example, by the video games that I played when I was young. In video games, you have these different levels that you advance to, moving through multiple spaces. And then the chats—at many points in my life, it seemed like online chatting was my only means of communication. It is a different way of speaking, of connecting. I didn’t think of it at first, but this is why I structure my films the way I do. It’s about how I see and relate to the world.”

Inasmuch as his film’s subjects have a single unifying purpose, it is to get themselves online—cadging working cell phones from friends or ranging around in search of a wifi signal. Binaries are invoked only to be busted wide open. Williams shows us ways of life at once state of the art and primitive, borderless and highly parochial, under the sway of both science and superstition. In a discursive conversation about “Black Magic,” two of the Mozambique youths muse over “people controlling one another from afar”—which, of course, is exactly what happens on the Chaturbate site they log onto. And while a sense of threatening environmental cataclysm hangs over the movie from the early images of streets flooded by an unspoken catastrophe, the film is also suffused with moments of bucolic natural beauty, of unspoiled beaches and forests and open fields in what seems like a perpetual gloaming. The mood of The Human Surge is mostly one of repose, but repose haunted by the prospect of work, the threat of which is felt throughout the film—shirking it, submitting to it, dreading waking up to it, getting fired, walking off of the job. (And yes, those are worker ants.) It makes for an exhilarating, boldly paradoxical experience—a headlong dive into the rich, knotty, sticky undergrowth amid a proliferation of tidy, well-lit paths. Full




http://nitroflare.com/view/16B08AFE9D6E726/The.Human.Surge.2016.720p.WEB-DL.h264.DD5.1-pirata00.mkv

Language(s):Spanish, Portuguese, Tagalog
Subtitles:English

Bookmark the permalink.