Edward F. Cline – Hook, Line and Sinker (1930)

 Edward F. Cline   Hook, Line and Sinker (1930)

thgc Edward F. Cline   Hook, Line and Sinker (1930)

Plot Synopsis
The comedy team of Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey made their fourth film appearance of 1930 in the hectic comedy-melodrama Hook Line and Sinker. This time the boys are cast as itinerant insurance salesmen Wilbur Boswell and J. Addington Ganzy (“Not Pansy — Ganzy, with a ‘G’”!) After talking their way out of a traffic ticket, Wilbur and Addington make the acquaintance of penniless socialite Mary Marsh (Dorothy Lee), who is fleeing a wealthy marriage arranged by her mother Rebecca (Jobyna Howland). Falling in love with Mary himself, Wilbur talks Ganzy into helping her renovate a seedy hotel willed to her by her uncle. With the dubious aid of a decrepit bellboy (George F. Marion) and a nutty house detective (Hugh Herbert), the boys turn the hotel into a thriving enterprise. The plot thickens when a gang of jewel thieves and a band of bootleggers register at the hotel, followed in short order by Mary’s mother and the girl’s prospective fiance, lawyer John Blackwell (Ralf Harolde) — who happens to be in league with the bootleggers! A wild gangland shoot-out and nocturnal chase caps this dated but amusing Wheeler and Woolsey vehicle.
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Wallace Worsley – The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923)

 Wallace Worsley    The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923)

thgc Wallace Worsley    The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923)

Wikipedia wrote:
The Hunchback of Notre Dame is a 1923 American film directed by Wallace Worsley and produced by Carl Laemmle and Irving Thalberg. It stars Lon Chaney, Sr., Patsy Ruth Miller, Norman Kerry, Nigel de Brulier, Brandon Hurst. The film is probably the second most famous adaptation of Victor Hugo’s novel, following the critically acclaimed, much reissued 1939 masterpiece by RKO Pictures. The film was Universal’s “Super Jewel” of 1923 and was their most successful silent film, grossing over $3 million.

The film is most notable for the grand sets that recall 15th century Paris as well as Lon Chaney’s performance and spectacular make-up as the tortured bell-ringer of Notre Dame. The film elevated Chaney, already a well-known character actor, to full star status in Hollywood. It also helped set a standard for many later horror films, including Chaney’s The Phantom of the Opera in 1925. In 1951, the film entered the public domain (in the USA) due to the claimants failure to renew its copyright registration in the 28th year after publication. Continue reading

Gustav Ucicky – Café Elektric (1927)

x43w Gustav Ucicky   Café Elektric (1927)

logoimdbb Gustav Ucicky   Café Elektric (1927)

The Café Elektric has a “mixed” clientele. This is where criminal gigolo Ferdl spends his evenings, but it´s also where men like construction tycoon Göttlinger celebrate a successful business deal with the girls. One of the girls is Hansi who dreams of a better life but remarks that “the likes of us never get out of the Elektric”. Meanwhile Göttlinger´s daughter Erni falls for Ferdl. When he demands money from her she can only steal from her father. Construction engineer Max is concerned over Erni´s possible downfall but covers her. Things change when he meets Hansi. When Ferdl uses a ring stolen by Erni to impress his former girlfriend Hansi, matters get complicated and fates entwine. Continue reading

Lee De Forest – Casey at the Bat (1922)

aCDlZKc Lee De Forest   Casey at the Bat (1922)

logoimdbb Lee De Forest   Casey at the Bat (1922)

Quote:
In his career, De Wolf Hopper recited Ernest Lawrence Thayer’s “Casey at the Bat” thousands of times. Here, wearing a tuxedo, he emerges from behind a curtain as if at a theater, gives a short introduction, and launches into the poem. The camera is stationary, and although Hopper stands in one place, his hands and arms, his face, and his voice are animated throughout. In delivery, it’s a minstrel performance. Continue reading

Clarence G. Badger – The Ropin’ Fool (1922)

qdt7 Clarence G. Badger   The Ropin Fool (1922)

thgc Clarence G. Badger   The Ropin Fool (1922)

In Ropin’ Fool (1922) Rogers plays Ropes Reilly, a cowboy who ropes anything that moves until a lynch mob decides to use Reilly’s rope for a hanging party, with Reilly as the guest of honor. Motion Picture World wrote: “Plentiful use of slow motion photography shows how it is done and dispels any possible belief that the stunts are faked. No audience can help but marvel as Rogers throws a figure eight around a galloping horse, or lassoes a rat with a piece of string, or brings to term a cat melodiously inclined.” Later Rogers would wryly claim fame as America’s “Poet Lariat.”
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J. Soares – A Filha do Advogado aka The Daughter of the Lawyer (1926)

y69g J. Soares   A Filha do Advogado aka The Daughter of the Lawyer (1926)

thgc J. Soares   A Filha do Advogado aka The Daughter of the Lawyer (1926)

“In Recife, Dr. Paulo is an important lawyer that has a daughter, Heloísa, with his paramour and living in the country. A few days before traveling to Europe, Dr. Paulo asks to a close friend to bring Heloísa to Recife. Meanwhile, his bohemian and irresponsible son Helvécio meets Heloísa, and without knowing that she is his sister, he tries to rape her, and she kills him. Heloísa is arrested and goes to trial without any evidence to prove that she self-defended her honor” Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil ( IMDB)
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Jess Robbins – The Lucky Dog (1921)

bmzu Jess Robbins   The Lucky Dog (1921)

logoimdbb Jess Robbins   The Lucky Dog (1921)

The Lucky Dog is the first film to include both members of the famous comedy duo of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, later known as Laurel and Hardy and is the first occasion that they worked together. Though they appear in scenes together, they play independent of each other and not as the comedic team that they would later become. Continue reading

pixel Jess Robbins   The Lucky Dog (1921)