Robert J. Flaherty – Nanook of the North [+Extras] (1922)

7yQjzp Robert J. Flaherty   Nanook of the North [+Extras] (1922)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Robert J. Flaherty   Nanook of the North [+Extras] (1922)

Roger Ebert @ Chicago Sun-Times, September 25, 2005 wrote:

There is an astonishing sequence in Robert J. Flaherty’s “Nanook of the North” (1922) in which his hero, the Inuit hunter Nanook, hunts a seal. Flaherty shows the most exciting passage in one unbroken shot. Nanook knows that seals must breathe every 20 minutes, and keep an air hole open for themselves in the ice of the Arctic winter. He finds such a hole, barely big enough to be seen and is poised motionless above it with his harpoon until a seal rises to breathe. Then he strikes and holds onto the line as the seal plunges to escape.

There is a desperate tug of war. Nanook hauls the line 10 or 12 feet out of the hole, and then is dragged back, sliding across the ice, and pulls again, and again. We can’t see, but he must have the line tied to his body — to lose would be to drown. He desperately signals for his fellow hunters to help him, and we see them running across the ice with their dogs as he struggles to hold on. They arrive at last, and three or four of them pull on the line. The seal prevails. Nanook uses his knife to enlarge the hole, and the seal at last is revealed and killed. The hunters immediately strip it of its blubber and dine on its raw flesh.
Continue reading

Yakov Protazanov – Chelovek iz restorana aka The Man From Restaurant (1927)

cz1qd1 Yakov Protazanov   Chelovek iz restorana aka The Man From Restaurant (1927)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Yakov Protazanov   Chelovek iz restorana aka The Man From Restaurant (1927)

Based on story by Ivan Shmelev.
The movie action starts very close before February democratic revolution in Russia in 1917.
Fate is cruel to waiter of capital city restaurant Skorohodov: his son dies on front, his wife perishes from grief, his daughter is excluded from grammar school because of lack of money to pay tuition.
Skorohodov decides to rent one of rooms in his poor apartment to a decent young man named Sokolin who is working as a courier in war industry committee .
The lodger and a girl fall in love with each other and soon decide to get married.
In meantime the father appoints his daughter as a violiinist in restaurant orchestra.
But rich factory owner Karasev rudely molests young blonde violinist and through blackmail expects to make her his mistress.
Continue reading

Yakov Protazanov – Chiny i lyudi AKA Ranks and People (1929)

v68xl Yakov Protazanov   Chiny i lyudi AKA Ranks and People (1929)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Yakov Protazanov   Chiny i lyudi AKA Ranks and People (1929)

Quote:
From his early silent works, the great Russian film director, Herr Yakov Protazanov, made literary adaptations from equally great Russian writers, as is the case with “Chiny I Lyudi” ( Ranks And People ) (1929) in which three short stories by Chekhov, “Anna On The Neck”, “Death Of A Petty Official” and “Chameleon” were assembled for the silent screen.
“Anna On The Neck” tells the story the young and beautiful Anna (Mariya Strelkova ) who has just married an old but rich civil servant. Anna thinks her marriage will rescue her father and her two brothers from a miserable life of poverty. Anna becomes disenchanted fast when her rich husband turns out to be an avaricious and severe man. Anna’s sad life changes when she attends a posh ball and every man there, including the mayor, is charmed by her. Anna’s husband hopes to get business advantages through this but Anna is thinking of revenge. Continue reading

Yakov Protazanov – Sorok pervyy AKA The Forty-First (1927)

5wzh Yakov Protazanov   Sorok pervyy AKA The Forty First (1927)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152 Yakov Protazanov   Sorok pervyy AKA The Forty First (1927)

The Forty-First, Boris Lavrenyev’s novella, written in only two days, has proven enduringly popular. It tells the story of a young woman snarpshooter fighting with the Reds in Turkestan. She misses her forty-first victim, a handsome White lieutenant, and ends up escorting him, by boat, into captivity across the Aral Sea. A storm, however, strands the two on an island. Sick with pneumonia, the lieutenant is nursed back to health by his Red escort, and the two fall in love. At the last, however, Mariutka shoots him dead when he tries to escape, thus making him “the forty-first.”
Sorok pervyy had been filmed as a silent, from the author’s own script, by Yakov Protazanov in 1927.
Continue reading

pixel Yakov Protazanov   Sorok pervyy AKA The Forty First (1927)