1941-1950

Valérien Schmidely & Hans Trommer – Romeo und Julia auf dem Dorfe (1941)

Quote:
While there is now at least a little bit of recognition for the early German and Austrian sound film, the same cannot be said for films from Switzerland. Although Switzerland never had a big film industry, especially not at that time, I assume there might be some real gems to discover, if this film here is any indication. Read More »

Georg Wilhelm Pabst – Der Prozeß (1948)

Quote:In the tradition of Eötvös, to whom the film is dedicated as a “pioneer for truth and justice”, Pabst portrays the reality of Jewish life in hauntingly designed scenes and explains both religious superstitions and racist, nationalistic and economic-political arguments against anti-Semitism , which is based on anti-Semitic pamphlets such as the alleged ‘Protocols of the Wise Men of Zion’: this forgery had not yet been published in 1882, but predecessor writings were already widespread and Pabst drew a parallel with this consciously used anachronism to Hitler, who in “Mein Kampf “Expressly mentions the ‘protocols’. Read More »

Heinosuke Gosho – Ima hitotabi no AKA Once More (1947)

Synopsis
Before the war, Nogami, a doctor who devotes himself to the caring of the poor, meets Akiko during a theatrical representation. She’s a sheltered girl from a wealthy bourgeois family who finds herself drawn to him and his humanitarian ideals. Read More »

André Malraux – Espoir aka Days of hope (1945)

1937, the Spanish civil war. Republicans fight against Franco’s army and need to bomb a bridge… in Teruel.
Turned on location… and almost in situation. Read More »

Carol Reed – Odd Man Out (1947)

Plot synopsis:
Johnny McQueen, leader of a clandestine Irish organization, has been hiding in the house of Kathleen and her mother, planning a hold-up that will provide his group with the funds needed to continue its activities. During the hold-up, things go sour… Read More »

Mitchell Leisen – Hold Back the Dawn (1941)

Quote:
This superior melodrama with a darkly comic tinge came out at a time when Mitchell Leisen’s career was running hot after a series of successes including films like Easy Living, Midnight, and Remember the Night. It was also the last film Billy Wilder (in partnership with Charles Brackett) was content with just writing the screenplay for. He was supposedly so annoyed by the way Leisen took liberties with his script that he resolved never to cede directorial control again. Read More »

Clarence Brown – The Human Comedy (1943)

Plot: Homer Macauley remains in a small town looking after his widowed mother and younger brother. Homer’s older brother is fighting the war in Europe. Written by Anonymous Read More »