Charles Lamont – Abbott and Costello Go to Mars (1953)

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

They don`t really go to Mars, they go to Venus, but first they go to New Orleans. While working at a missile base, Bud Abbott and Lou Costello inadvertently launch a rocket ship with themselves aboard. After a wild ride around New York City (the Statue of Liberty ducks when the rocket heads her way), Bud and Lou land in the outskirts of New Orleans. The boys are convinced that they`ve reached Mars, and their faith in this supposition is affirmed when they come across several strangely costumed `creatures` (actually revellers at the Mardi Gras). Meanwhile, bank robbers Jack Kruschen and Horace McMahon stow away on A&C`s rocketship. When Bud and Lou return, the crooks force them to make a quick getaway into outer space. After several days of weightlessness, the four space travellers land on Venus, a planet populated by the gorgeous winners of the Miss Universe contest (including Anita Ekberg). Venusian queen Mari Blanchard falls in love with Costello, only to order him and his companions to return to earth when Lou proves to be unfaithful. Reportedly, this bizarre melange of sci-fi and slapstick was based on a story by Charles Beaumont, who received no screen credit (it`s worth noting that Beaumont`s later Queen of Outer Space boasts a remarkably similar plotline). Long considered the team`s worst film, Abbott and Costello Go to Mars (`and about time!` quipped the New York Times` TV-movie reviewer) is rather likeable in its own incoherent way. – All Movie Guide Continue reading

FacebookGoogle+PinterestTumblrTwitterDeliciousStumbleUponShare

Orson Welles – Touch of Evil [Restored Version] (1958)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Roger Ebert / September 13, 1998

Come on, read my future for me. You haven’t got any. What do you mean? Your future is all used up. So speaks a fortune-telling madam, played by Marlene Dietrich, to the drunken sheriff of a border town, played by Orson Welles, in “Touch of Evil.”

Her words have a sad resonance, because Welles was never again to direct in Hollywood after making this dark, atmospheric story of crime and corruption.

It was named best film at the 1958 Brussels World Fair (Godard and Truffaut were on the jury), but in America it opened on the bottom half of a double bill, failed, and put an end to Welles’ prospects of working within the studio system. Yet the film has always been a favorite of those who enjoy visual and dramatic flamboyance. “I’d seen the film four or five times before I noticed the story,” the director Peter Bogdanovich once told his friend Orson. “That speaks well for the story,” Welles rumbled sarcastically, but Bogdanovich replied, “No, no–I mean I was looking at the direction.” Continue reading

Satyajit Ray – Pather Panchali (1955)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Sometime in the early years of the century, a boy, Apu, is born to a poor Brahmin family in a village in Bengal. The father, a poet and priest, cannot earn enough to keep his family going. Apu’s sister, Durga, is forever stealing guavas from the neighbour’s orchards. All these add to the daily struggles of the mother’s life, notwithstanding her constant bickering with old aunt who lives with the family. (IMDb)
Continue reading

Leo McCarey – An Affair to Remember (1957)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

———————– Plot Synopsis allmovie.com ———————–
An Affair to Remember, director Leo McCarey’s scene-for-scene remake of his own 1939 film Love Affair, isn’t really an improvement on the original, but it’s equally as enjoyable. Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr, high-profile types both engaged to be married to other people, meet and fall in love during an ocean voyage. To test the depth of their commitment to each other, Grant and Kerr promise that, if they’re still in love at the end of six months, they will meet again at the top of the Empire State Building. Clips from An Affair to Remember were used as “reference points” throughout the 1993 romantic comedy Sleepless in Seattle, which likewise concluded atop the Empire State Building. Disproving the theory that “Third Time’s the Charm,” Warren Beatty attempted to remake Affair to Remember, again titled Love Affair, in 1994. Continue reading

France Stiglic – Volca nok aka Night of the Wolves (1955)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Quote:
This is Macedonia’s contribution to what was once the cottage industry of ex-Yugoslav Partisan war movies.

I will simplify this one for the outsider that is not well verse in Macedonian history, particularly WWII – Macedonian partisans take up the struggle against Bulgarian fascists that occupy Macedonia. This was not by any means an easy battle since Bulgaria was the only German ally that did not send troops to the Russian front. Thus, the entire Bulgarian military machine could, without distraction, dedicate its efforts to crushing the Macedonian resistance. Continue reading

Stanley Kubrick – Spartacus [+Extras] (1960)

http://img638.imageshack.us/img638/5527/spartakus.jpg

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Review from the Criterion website :
Stanley Kubrick directed a cast of screen legends—including Kirk Douglas as the indomitable gladiator that led a Roman slave revolt—in the sweeping epic that defined a genre and ushered in a new Hollywood era. The assured acting, lush Technicolor cinematography, bold costumes, and visceral fight sequences won Spartacus four Oscars; the blend of politics and sexual suggestion scandalized audiences. Today Kubrick’s controversial classic, the first film to openly defy Hollywood’s blacklist, remains a landmark of cinematic artistry and history. Continue reading

Brian Desmond Hurst – Scrooge AKA A Christmas Carol [+Commentary] (1951)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Scrooge is a 1951 film adaptation of Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol. It starred Alastair Sim as Ebenezer Scrooge and was directed by Brian Desmond Hurst, with a screenplay by Noel Langley. It was released as A Christmas Carol in the United States.

Comparison with the source material:
In the film, Mrs Dilber is the name of the charwoman, whereas in the book the woman was unnamed and the laundress was named Mrs Dilber. The charwoman’s role is greatly expanded in the film, to the point that she receives second billing in the list of characters. Continue reading

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...