Denis Héroux – Jusqu’au cou AKA Treading Water (1964)

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The adventure of a young university student confronted with love and the Quebec separatist movement of the 60s. Denis Héroux, who directed this film while in university, says, ”I realized my strongest characters, those who oriented the film almost against my will, were ardent separatist, sometimes even terrorist. But I was stuck with them and had to continue following them.” Continue reading

Masao Adachi – Ryakusho: renzoku shasatsuma AKA Serial Killer (1969)

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Midnight Eye wrote:
A horrifying series of murders, committed by a teenaged killer in 1968, prompted a group of filmmakers to chart his path, capturing the things he might have seen before committing his crimes. Their result is this provocative, rarely-screened meditation on geography and society. Continue reading

Thomas White & Allan Zion – Who’s Crazy? (1966)

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The story behind the rediscovery of “Who’s Crazy?,” a 1965 film directed by Thomas White that’s screening at Anthology Film Archives tonight through Sunday, is so unusual that it raised my suspicions along with my curiosity. The movie screened at the Cannes Film Festival in 1966, but it hasn’t been shown publicly since then and was widely believed to be lost. (Also, White never made another feature.) In its absence, the movie was famous for its soundtrack—in particular, for its music score, by the central jazz modernist Ornette Coleman and his trio. Continue reading

Larry Jordan – Big Sur: The Ladies (1966)

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In describing the process of BIG SUR, artist Lawrence Jordan writes, “As with RODIA-ESTUDIANTINA only one shot, which probably was the result of lapse in concentration, was deleted from the original camera roll. This film was intended to extend my experiments with the ‘in-camera’ film, and is probably one of the most successful. Against the coastline of the Big Sur country the camera catches swiftly shifting fragments of the women at the baths, playing the guitar, cutting their hair, sleeping. In this case I attempted to use the camera movement to slightly smear the images onto the film emulsion in a manner parallel with the use of broad different medium from music or painting, I have always been interested in the dynamic parallels that existed once photography in its still form was released into time (the parallel with music) and into motion (the parallel with the brush stroke).” Continue reading