1971-1980

Paul Vecchiali – C’est la vie! AKA That’s Life (1980)

The world and a life in four walls, and another portrait of a mother – selfish and generous, mercurial and unchanging. C’est la vie! (1980) takes Pagnol and Renoir’s experiments with open-air theatre to inspired and ecstatic conclusions, especially the latter’s love of depth-framing across windows and partitions, and lays the groundwork for Vecchiali’s later experiments with long-take space and time in Once More (1988). Also a pseudo-sequel to Marie-Claude Treilhou’s exquisite Simone Barbès ou la vertu (1980), reaffirming the Diagonale as not just a production model, but a kind of surrogate family, and a creative universe unto this forged community and itself. With Chantal Delsaux, Ingrid Bourgoin, Jean-Christophe Bouvet, and my beloved Hélène Surgère and Michel Delahaye. Read More »

Shinsuke Ogawa – Sanrizuka: Heta buraku AKA Sanrizuka: Heta Village AKA Narita: Heta Village (1973)

This two-and-a-half-hour documentary by Japanese master Ogawa Shinsuke (1935-1992) is part of his seven-film series in which he documented the fight of students and local peasants against the construction of the monstrous Narita airport, against the expropriation of their farmland and their resettlement and the violent clashes between protesters and the police in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. Read More »

Mu Chu & Hai-Feng Wei – Diao shou guai zhao AKA Snake Fist Fighter AKA Master with Cracked Fingers (1973)

Young Jackie was intrigued by Kung Fu since an early age, but his father strictly forbade its practice. One day, he meets an old beggar who offers to teach Jackie how to fight. Jackie grows up to be quite good, though he keeps his knowledge a secret until he is forced to fight by an extortion ring that’s putting the squeeze on his uncle’s restaurant. Read More »

Abbas Kiarostami – Mossafer aka The Traveller (1974)

Synopsis
The Traveler is a 1974 Iranian drama film directed by Abbas Kiarostami that tells the story of Hassan Darabi, a troublesome, amoral 10-year-old boy in a small Iranian town. He wishes to see the Iran national football team play an important match in Tehran. In order to achieve that, he scams his friends and neighbors. After a number of adventures, he finally reaches Tehran stadium at the time of the match. The film addresses the boy’s determination in his goal and his indifference to the effects of his actions on other people, particularly those who are closest to him. In its element, the film is an examination of human behavior and the balance of right and wrong. Read More »

Ivan Reitman – Cannibal Girls (1973)

Newlyweds Clifford (Eugene Levy, AMERICAN PIE) and Gloria (Andrea Martin, BLACK CHRISTMAS and its remake) go way off the beaten path for a honeymoon in the snowy Canadian town of Farmhaven. The innkeeper Mrs. Wainwright (May Jarvis) tells them of the legend of the Cannibal Girls who lured men to their isolated farmhouse to kill and eat; then, of course, she recommends that they sample the local cuisine at a gourmet restaurant now residing in the same old farmhouse. The restaurant is run by the top-hatted and cloaked Reverend Alex St. John (Ronald Ulrich) and is staffed by three beautiful women (Randall Carpenter, Bonnie Neilson, and Mira Pawluk) and a hunchbacked henchman (Bunker). Read More »

Carlos Aured – El espanto surge de la tumba AKA Horror Rises from the Tomb (1973)

Synopsis:
In Medieval France a warlock is be-headed and his wife tortured and executed. Hundreds of years later an isolated group of people discover his head buried on their property. Soon it comes back to life, possessing people and using them to commit sacrifices and to search for the rest of his body. Read More »

Eddie Romero – The Twilight People (1972)

Synopsis:
A scientist kidnaps a man and transports him to an island, intent on turning him into a super-being. The man obviously doesn’t like this idea, so he tries to escape with the help of the scientist’s daughter and a band of half-human, half-animal creatures. Read More »