1971-1980

Andrzej Wajda – Wesele AKA The Wedding (1973)

Quote:
It’s 1900, and for the last 130 years Poland has been wiped off the map of Europe; it’s still occupied by three invaders: Russia, Austria and Prussia. In a village near Cracow, a wedding takes place between a poet from the city and a country girl. The intelligentsia celebrates alongside the peasantry, but this is the full extent of any “agreement” between these two social classes, and the wedding guests are made aware of it by visiting apparitions. The chance for a national uprising is duly lost. Read More »

Yannick Bellon – Quelque part quelqu’un AKA Somewhere, Someone (1972)

Quote:
The description of several fates, several desperate lives in an inhuman city. A city where no one really exists. It is probably the most depressing movie – french movie – of all time. Every detail, every shot, every dialogue shows us there is no future for the human being. All along this feature, the director – Bellon – gives the audience sequences of darkness, monotony, emptiness. Death in a near future. All kind of deaths. The score makes me think of a whisper, a song from a graveyard. I would say it’s a sort of documentary. Read More »

Roberto Rossellini – L’Età di Cosimo de Medici AKA The Age of Medici AKA The Age of Cosimo de Medici (1972)

Synopsis:
This three-part saga evokes the social, economic, and religious life of fifteenth-century Florence through two of its leading lights: banker Cosimo de’ Medici and art theorist Leon Battista Alberti. The Age of the Medici is like a Renaissance painting come to life. The three episodes of approximately 90 minutes each, begins as a movie about the shrewd worldliness of the banker Cosimo de’ Medici and ends as a tribute to the scholarly humanism of the author and architect Leon Battista Alberti. “Medicis” leaves us with an impression of Quattrocento Florence as a city of sublime harmony in which art and commerce are in perfect balance, seamlessly interdependent. Read More »

Roberto Rossellini – Cartesius (1974)

Rossellini, 1973: One makes films in order to become a better human being.
The New York Times, : Just watching Rossellini’s magnificent work may help a bit in that department as well.

In the final phase of his career, Italian master Roberto Rossellini embarked on a dramatic, daunting project: a series of television films about knowledge and history, made in an effort to teach, where contemporary media were failing. Looking at the Western world’s major figures and moments, yet focusing on the small details of daily life, Rossellini was determined not to recount history but to relive it, as it might have been, unadorned and full of the drama of the everyday. This selection of Rossellini’s history films presents The Age of the Medici, Cartesius and Blaise Pascal – works that don’t just enliven the past but illuminate the ideas that have brought us to where we are today. Read More »

Tatyana Lioznova – Semnadtsat mgnoveniy vesny AKA Seventeen Moments of Spring (1973)

A 1973 Soviet twelve-part television series, directed by Tatyana Lioznova and based on the novel of the same title by Yulian Semyonov. The series portrays the exploits of Maxim Isaev, a Soviet spy operating in Nazi Germany under the name Max Otto von Stierlitz, depicted by Vyacheslav Tikhonov. Stierlitz is tasked with disrupting the negotiations between Karl Wolff and Allen Dulles taking place in Switzerland, aimed at forging a separate peace between Germany and the Western Allies. The series is considered the most successful Soviet espionage thriller ever made, and is one of the most popular television series in Russian history. Read More »

Anatoliy Karanovich & Sergei Yutkevich – Ilinskiy o Mayakovskom AKA Mayakovsky Laughs (1973)

This little-seen and little-discussed film combines animation with self-reflexive, live action segments to embody the anarchic, satiric spirit of the poet and playwright Vladimir Mayakovsky (1893-1930). The film also showcases Sergei Yuktevich’s fondness for formal experimentation. It is nominally adapted from Mayakovsky’s play “The Bedbug” and his screenplay “Forget All About the Fireplace.” Read More »

Janusz Nasfeter – Nie bede cie kochac AKA I Won’t Love You (1974)

Synopsis
In an idyllic working class community, 13 year old Anka grows up, going through stages of adolescence, dreaming, first love and gossiping with girlfriends. Roughly disturbed by the shame and disgrace of alcoholism – leaves unwashable stains upon the community, that tries to cope with abuse and depression, and the system (including school teachers) who try to avoid the subject. This story was aimed at parents, to give them morally an insight into what happens when a young girl has to deal with the disgrace of an alcoholic father and a mentally instable mother. Very well acted by Grazyna Michalska as Anka. Read More »