1981-1990

Aleqsandre Rekhviashvili – Gza shinisaken AKA The Way Home (1981)

The film is set in southern Georgia, which until the end of XIX century was dominated by
the Ottoman Empire. Tragic times gave rise to people of high spiritual strength, such as
Antimoz Iverieli – the philosopher-educator. Having experienced as a child cruelty and
injustice, it becomes the path of public service. Having been removed by the Turks in
Romania, a hero by all means wants to return home. Sentenced to death, Antimoz
remains in the memory of his countrymen a champion of justice. Read More »

Philippe Garrel – Liberté, la nuit (1983)

a title with a comma in the middle for a film divided in two parts. A film in black and white with a dark side and a jovial side. The first part of the title evokes politics, as the story recalls the days of the Algerian War of Independence; the second part represents the mood that hovers over the eminently painful images. There isn’t even a hint of daylight in the freedom of the title. It only lives metaphorically in the darkness and languor of the night. — description by Violeta Kovacsics in the book “Philippe Garrel: Filmmaking Revealed” Read More »

Armando Robles Godoy – Sonata soledad (1987)

“Sonata Soledad” is a film done to three musical times (Time, Counterpoints and Variations). In this movie, Robles Godoy radicalizes its position of author. Read More »

Frunze Dovlatyan – Karot AKA Yearning (1990)

Tragic events in Armenian history are echoed in this incisive film. Arakel Eloyan, a survivor of the 1915 genocide, has built a new life with his family in Soviet Armenia.
Still, he longs to once again see his home village, now a part of Turkey. His nostalgic yearning pulls him across the Soviet border, but the Soviet government views his journey as a potential act of treason. Read More »

Raoul Peck – Haitian Corner (1987)

A poet from Haiti flees to America after being imprisoned in his native country. Recovering from the experience, he begins to examine his past. One day he encounters his former torturer, and becomes obsessed with taking his revenge. Read More »

Nobuhiko Ôbayashi – Noyuki yamayuki umibe yuki AKA To the Fields, to the Hills, to the Beaches [B&W Version] (1986)

During the fervently nationalist months leading up to World War II, a rebellious teenager is transferred to a new primary school in a small Inland Sea town. He vies with the school’s reigning bully, who takes a romantic interest in his older stepsister. When they learn she’s going to be sold to a brothel to pay off her father’s debts, they form an uneasy alliance to free her. With surprising moments of caricature and slapstick, Obayashi celebrates the anarchic world of adolescence while also satirizing adult hypocrisy and conformism. Read More »

James Ivory – Maurice (1987)

Quote:
Set against the stifling conformity of pre-World War I English society, E.M. Forster’s Maurice is a story of coming to terms with one’s sexuality and identity in the face of disapproval and misunderstanding. Maurice Hall (James Wilby) and Clive Durham (Hugh Grant) find themselves falling in love at Cambridge. In a time when homosexuality is punishable by imprisonment, the two must keep their feelings for one another a complete secret. After a friend is arrested and disgraced for “the unspeakable vice of the Greeks,” Clive abandons his forbidden love and marries a young woman. Read More »