1981-1990

Tomás Gutiérrez Alea – Hasta cierto punto AKA Up to a Certain Point (1983)

Documentary filmmaker Oscar (Oscar Alvarez) is researching machismo in Cuba. He learns that the nation’s chauvinistic men have problems with strong and autonomous females and expectations that fidelity is essential for women, but not for men.
However as the project progresses he begins to fall for his spirited colleague (Mirtha Ibarra), presenting a dilemma.
Should he be honest about his feelings and leave his wife for this new love, and can he make an objective documentary when he is himself entwined in the issues he is studying. Read More »

    Michael Blackwood – Deconstructivist Architects (1990)

    A documentary about the early beginning of the deconstructivist era of the architecture flourishing in the 80´ties.
    Interviews with Zaha Hadid, Peter Eisenman, Bernard Tschumi, Frank Gehry, Daniel Liebeskind, Derrida, Micheal Sorkin and more. Read More »

      Kaspar Rostrup – Dansen med Regitze AKA Memories of a Marriage (1989)

      From: Amazon.com
      Memories of a Marriage (based on Martha Christensen’s best-selling novel, Dansen med Regitze) is a wonderful, moving and superbly acted film featuring what may be the greatest on-screen performance by the luminous Ghita Nørby, one of Denmark’s finest actresses (and a lovely person–I met her once in Seattle). The film traces the relationship between Regitze and her husband, Karl-Aage; in the present, Regitze has received devastating news about her health. Thus, much of the film is a flashback to the ups and downs of their marriage, which began when they first met under the Occupation in World War II. Regitze is a strong-willed young woman, whereas Karl-Aage seems more weak and pliable. Still, they love each other and complement. Read More »

        Bille August – Pelle erobreren AKA Pelle the Conqueror (1987)

        When his wife dies, Lassefar takes his 12-year-old son Pelle from their home in Sweden to Denmark in search of a better life. Signing on as laborers at a large farm, father and son undergo numerous trials, including prejudice against immigrants and run-ins with those more powerful than themselves in both the physical and the social sense. Over the course of a year, young Pelle learns what it takes to survive in a harsh and unforgiving world. Read More »

          Nikos Papatakis – I Fotografia AKA La Photo (1986)

          Quote:
          Ilias Apostolou, a young furrier who has had a hard time under the dictatorship, leaves Castoria in 1971 to emigrate to France, where he hopes to join a distant relative of his, Gerassimos Tzivas, who has been living there since 1950. With him, he takes nothing from his homeland but a photograph of a person that he finds on the pavement. He asks Gerassimos to help him in finding work in Paris. A misunderstanding around the photograph, however, sets off a series of dramatic events. Read More »

            Pat O’Neill – Water and Power (1989)

            ”This rarely screened 1989 masterpiece by Pat O’Neill is a moving meditation on industrialization, focusing on the dystopic desert created by Los Angeles’s vast water consumption. O’Neill conceived the film partly as an answer to Godfrey Reggio’s mind-numbing Koyaanisqatsi (1983), a hypnotic inventory of touristy landscapes showing a world out of balance. In contrast O’Neill creates images full of internal contradictions, using optical printing to collage different locales and suggest the inevitable conflict of industry and nature. One slow dissolve between the Owens Valley desert and Los Angeles at night suggests a direct cause and effect: the city flourished only by despoiling the land. Using time lapse to make weather changes visible, O’Neill renders people as fleeting shadows whose power to alter the landscape fails to mitigate the fragility and shortness of human life on a geologic scale.” – Fred Camper, The Chicago Reader Read More »

              Alejandro Jodorowsky – Santa Sangre [+ director’s commentary] (1989)

              Quote:
              Santa Sangre is the surreal horror story about a young man, Fenix (Axel Jodorowsky) who has grown up in a circus with his mother Concha (Blanca Guerra) and his philandering father. Fenix witnesses a brutal fight between his mother and father, at the end of which his mother loses both of her arms and his father commits suicide. Fenix spends years in an insane asylum, before his mother persuades him to act as her hands in her bizarre nightclub act. Soon, Concha is having Fenix perform a variety of murders, where he is killing every female in sight. Though the film has some of the hallucinatory qualities of Jodorowsky’s earlier films, Santa Sangre doesn’t quite have the same punch, particularly in terms of cerebral and emotional impact, despite its fine visuals. Santa Sangre is available in both R-rated and NC-17 edits. Read More »