1991-2000

Ulrich Seidl – Mit Verlust ist zu rechnen AKA Loss Is to Be Expected (1992)

Quote:
In a small Austrian village near the Czech border lives Sepp Paur, a widower. The food supply that his late wife stored in the freezer is running low. It is time for Sepp to look for another wife. He looks across the border, where the widow Paula lives. Two people, two neighboring villages. In between? The border. The film is about all these, but not only. It’s also about the loss of borders, the loss of home, the loss of youth, the loss of love. Read More »

    Alex Bag – Untitled Fall ’95 (1995)

    In Untitled Fall ’95, Bag, at the time an art student, “plays” Bag the art student. In a series of deadpan performances, Bag gathers fragments of pop detritus, fashioning a thoroughly mediated document that is at once a celebration and a record of loss. With the narrative inevitability of a TV serial, the eight diaristic segments trace a woman’s struggle to make sense of her experience at art school. As each installment marks the start of a new semester, Bag’s character addresses the camera with her latest observations and frustrations. Read More »

      Jonathan Nossiter – Signs & Wonders (2000)

      Signs & Wonders is a 2000 psychological thriller directed by Jonathan Nossiter and co-written with British poet James Lasdun (also co-writer of Sunday) was inspired by the Polish surrealist novel, Kosmos of Witold Gombrowicz. Read More »

        Kinji Fukasaku – Omocha AKA The Geisha House (1998)

        Set in the late 1950s, when geisha culture was threatened by moral crusades, it tells the story of Omacha (Miyamoto Maki), a young girl who sees the geisha life as a way to lift her poverty-stricken family from their hand-to-mouth existence. Through her eyes, we see the protocols and complex financial relationships which dictate the running of the geisha house. Fukasaku’s film is a work of great delicacy with moments of hypnotic beauty, and his tender direction, often touched with a sense of wonder, fills the screen with lovingly constructed scenes. At its heart is the poignant situation of the women who must sacrifice their normal relationships to live an ambiguous life in which they are a key part of society while being kept, for the most part, on its periphery, like perpetual mistresses. Read More »

          Michael Snow – To Lavoisier, Who Died in the Reign of Terror (1991)

          Quote:
          To Lavoisier Who Died in the Reign of Terror (1991) is a collaboration with filmmaker Carl Brown, who specializes in homebrewed chemical film development. In a series of tableaux, people perform everyday tasks — sleeping, dining, reading, card-playing — as the camera arcs past and over them (the replete set of positions recalls La région centrale’s movements). Brown abraded the film stock, creating a continuous dynamic surface-effect tension with the comparatively static views and cueing the soundtrack, the crackle of fire. The physics and chemistry of combustion were the scientific focus of Lavoisier, the 18th-century savant. Read More »

            Hartmut Bitomsky – Die UFA (1992)

            Quote:
            The latest film by Hartmut Bitomsky is, just like much of his early work, a original film essay about film and film history. Just as in earlier films, he makes inventive use of the potential offered by the medium video to analyse films.The history of the UFA is the story of a risky financial venture in the twenties and a propaganda instrument in the thirties. Bitomsky’s approach stands out because he involvesthis social and political context in investigating and dissecting films. Read More »

              Maria Klonaris & Katerina Thomadaki – L’Ange Amazonien : Un portrait de Lena Vandrey (1992)

              Quote:
              “Les œuvres de Lena Vandrey qui se trouvent au Musée d’Art Brut de Lausanne, acquises par Dubuffet, sont des effigies de femmes, des sortes de déesses, d’amazones, des personnages totémiques d’une grande force d’expression. Elles sont faites de matières très brutes. Ce n’est pas de la peinture illusionniste. Il y a une tension dramatique qui détruit le système de représentation pour créer un contact beaucoup plus charnel avec l’objet” (Michel Thévoz). Read More »