Gust Van den Berghe – Lucifer (2014)

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On his downfall from Heaven to Hell, Lucifer passes through the earthly paradise, a village in Mexico, where elderly Lupita and her granddaughter Maria live. Lupita’s brother Emanuel pretends he’s paralyzed so he can drink and gamble while the two women tend to the sheep. Lucifer senses an opportunity and plays the miraculous healer. He forces Emanuel to walk again, seduces Maria and makes Lupita doubt about her faith. He didn’t bring bad luck, he only illuminated the line between good and evil, where it didn’t exist before. Continue reading

Raymond Depardon – 8e étage (2014)

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On the eighth floor, Raymond Depardon filmed a minute of silence with eight personalities who worked for the Cartier Foundation for Contemporary Art: David Lynch, Patti Smith, William Eggleston, Takeshi Kitano, Ron Mueck, Jean Michel Alberola, Agnes Varda and Misha Gromov. Continue reading

Mauro Herce – Dead Slow Ahead (2015)

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For over two months, Mauro Herce and his crew travelled aboard the freighter My Fair Lady, shooting 14-16 hours a day as it made it laborious journey from Ukraine to New Orleans. Blurring the lines between documentary and fiction, Dead Slow Ahead detaches itself from reality in favour of setting a science fiction, dystopian tone. Welding disparate images and foreboding sounds from deep within the labyrinthine corridors of the ship, Herce has transformed what could have been a dull documentation of life aboard the ship and imbued it with an otherworldly sense of wonder. Continue reading

Raymond Depardon & Claudine Nougaret – Au bonheur des maths (2011)

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This film is based on the simplest staging principle: 9 high-level mathematicians have each less than 4 minutes to tell, in front of the camera, what fascinates or moves them, brings them joy, makes them dream or laugh in their scientific activities.

The film was shot for the purpose of the exhibition “Mathématiques, un dépaysement soudain” (Maths: a sudden change of scenery), which took place from October 2011 to March 2012 at the Cartier Foundation in Paris. Continue reading

Darezhan Omirbayev – Darezhan Omirbayev: Educational Films (2015)

Educational film by Darezhan Omirbayev for film schools students.

AUTOGRAPHS
A series of educational films, “Autographs” is a textbook for students of cinema department, which is dedicated to the works of great authors of word cinema. These films show and explore the most colorful and unique pieces that are typical and repetitive directorial techniques from the film (scenes), which are important in the work of one or another author. In the processof viewing and analysis of educational films, students studying filmmaking, film studies, as well as the cinematography, will be able to become better acquainted with the work of the filmmakers of world cinema – identify importa,t artistic techniques and visual solutions, which subsequently formed different directions in the cinema, and made the foundation of the evolution of “cinema language”. “Autographs” promote deeper study of the existing methods of film direction, and help to identify and compare in a condensed form the features of the style, filmmajer’s “handwriting”. “Autographs” include a series of educational films, manuals on a brief study of the works of such distinguished filmmakers as Jean Vigo, Michelangelo Antonioni, Alfred Hitchcock, Ingmar Bergman, Andrei Tarkovsky, Robert Bresson and others. Continue reading

Sara Fishko – The Jazz Loft According to W. Eugene Smith (2016)

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About the Jazz Loft Project

In January 1955 W. Eugene Smith, a celebrated photographer at Life magazine whose quarrels with his editors were legendary, quit his longtime well-paying job at the magazine. He was thirty-six. He was ambitious, quixotic, in search of greater freedom and artistic license. He turned his attention to a freelance assignment in Pittsburgh, a three-week job that turned into a four-year obsession and in the end, remained unfinished. In a letter to Ansel Adams, Smith described it as a “debacle” and an “embarrassment.” Continue reading