2011-2020

Jem Cohen – Counting (2015)

Synopsis:
Fifteen distinct but interconnected chapters, shot in locations from Russia to New York City to Istanbul. Together, these build to a reckoning at the intersection of city symphony, diary, and essay film. Perhaps the most personal of Cohen’s documentary works, COUNTING measures street life, light, and time, noting not only surveillance and over-development but resistance and its phantoms as manifested in music, animals and everyday magic. Read More »

Ruth Beckermann – Die Geträumten AKA The Dreamed Ones (2016)

Quote:
The themes of love and hate are depicted in the movie. At center stage are the two poets Ingeborg Bachmann and Paul Celan, who came to know each other in post‐war Vienna. Their vivid postal exchange creates the textual basis of the film. Read More »

Frédéric Mermoud – Moka (2016)

A grieving woman pursues a couple whom she suspects of killing her son in a hit-and-run.
Equipped with a few items of clothing, a little bit of money, and a weapon, Diane Kramer leaves for Evian. She has a sole obsession: to find the driver of the moka-colored Mercedes who ran over her son and turned her life upside down. But the path of truth has more bends than it appears. Diane discovers that she must confront another woman, both endearing and mysterious.

A lightly Hitchcock-like atmosphere, where fear and guilt take new forms. Read More »

James N. Kienitz Wilkins – Indefinite Pitch (2016)

Framed as a pathetic movie pitch set in Berlin, Indefinite Pitch points toward unconscious and elusive influences in life and in cinema mimicked by the rising and falling sonic frequency that, like an alarm, has an extremely indefinite pitch. Read More »

Denis Côté – Répertoire des villes disparues AKA Ghost Town Anthology (2019)

Denis Cote chronicles the bizarre after-effects of a small-town tragedy, weaving supernatural elements into the tattered social fabric of a rural community.
Loosely adapted from the debut novel by Montreal-based writer Laurence Olivier, this is a curious film, deliberately threadbare in its plotting and muted in its emotional effect. But it is open to any number of interpretations, touching on fear of outsiders and otherness, the importance of reckoning with the past and the danger for insular small-town communities of being forgotten, as much due to their own closed-off nature as to big-city migration. It could just as easily be dismissed as slight, but you get out of it what you’re willing to put in. Read More »

Quentin Dupieux – Le daim AKA Deerskin (2019)

Quote:
A man’s obsession with his designer deerskin jacket causes him to blow his life savings and turn to crime. Read More »

Bingham Bryant & Kyle Molzan – For the Plasma (2014)

In a remote house in Maine, two friends predict shifts in global financial markets by viewing footage of the forest.
Quote:
A digital-pastoral drama of friendship, landscape and technology, “For the Plasma” begins as the story of two young women (Anabelle LeMieux and Rosalie Lowe) employed as forest-fire lookouts in Northern Maine, and ends in a hundred places at once. Along the way, the girls make financial predictions based on surveillance footage of the surrounding forest, the local lighthouse keeper and a pair of unusual investors interrupt their solitude, and a dreamlike portrait of small town America and contemporary life is revealed. “For the Plasma” is a film of minimal means but ambition, shot in Super 16mm and 4:3 with a small cast and crew, and scored by the great Japanese experimental composer, Keiichi Suzuki. great Japanese experimental composer, Keiichi Suzuki. Read More »