Action

Robert Day – Tarzan and the Great River (1967)

Plot:
Tarzan is summoned to Brazil by an old friend to stop an evil tribal cult from destroying native villages and enslaving the survivors. The Lord of the Jungle is accompanied on his quest by a pretty blonde doctor, a boy and a grizzled sea captain. Written by Marty M. Read More »

Leonardo Favio – Juan Moreira (1973)

AllMovie wrote:
In this amazing and complex Argentine historical drama, much of the true story of the 19th-century assassin Juan Moreira comes to the screen. At the time of its release, this Argentine film was the most popular locally made film ever to be shown there. Juan Moreira was a popular folk hero on a par with Billy the Kid in the U.S., and many stories and songs have been written about him over the years. In the movie, the innocent herdsman Moreira (Rodolfo Beban) is thrown into jail at the behest of an important cattle-baron. He emerges from jail a changed man. After killing the cattleman who had him sent to jail, he at first hides among a tribe of native peoples then moves into a brothel. Read More »

Michael Cimino – Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (1974)

Plot Synopsis [AMG]As much an eccentric character study as a road movie, Michael Cimino’s directorial debut follows the adventures of a quartet of misfits in their life of crime. Retired thief Thunderbolt (Clint Eastwood) and sweet drifter Lightfoot (Jeff Bridges) meet cute when Thunderbolt jumps into Lightfoot’s stolen car to escape a gunman. The pair embarks on an oddball journey to get Thunderbolt’s loot from an old robbery before his former associates, the sadistic Red (George Kennedy) and cretinous Goody (Geoffrey Lewis), get to it first, but all four are too late; the one-room schoolhouse hiding place has apparently vanished. So instead, the four play house and work legit jobs while they plot to rob the same place Thunderbolt and Red hit before. Read More »

William Friedkin – To Live and Die in L.A. (1985)

Quote:
Worthy of the director of “French Connection,” the pace of this set- in-LA action thriller immediately draws the view in and never lets up. A car chase in the best traditions of “Bullitt” and of Friedkin’s own “French Connection” is centers the action, but the motivation of a rogue agent obsessed with the death of his partner, and clearly with his own death, are well- and credibly- drawn. The most sympathetic character in the story is not one of the principals. It is a female informer. An ex-con at the mercy of those on both sides of the law, she is callously exploited by all. Her feelings for Agent Chance are more implied than explicit, but they are believable as is his indifference to her as a person. This riveting film never lets your attention wander. Thanks to Friedkin, we are told, we are given a credible ending to this taut, tightly- wound thriller. An under-exposed, under-appreciated work; excellent for the genre. Read More »

Sang-ok Shin – Cheonnyeon ho AKA A Thousand Year Old Fox (1969)

IMDB:
Once upon a time, under the reign of the three kingdoms, there was a woman who tempts a Buddhist priest named Cho. She is a one-thousand-year-old fox who intends to reincarnate as a human being. Not knowing this, Cho lives with the fox. But in the end, they get separated harboring sadness of unfulfilled love in this world.
– Written by KCCLA Read More »

Riccardo Freda – Il cavaliere misterioso AKA The Mysterious Rider (1948)

Quote:
However trivial – or downright ridiculous – the plot may become, Freda shows a mastery of sheer cinematic style that puts most of the more highly-touted Italian directors to shame. Like Minnelli or Sirk, Mizoguchi or Ophuls, Visconti or Fellini, he is in love with the visual and sensuous possibilities of the camera itself. The breathtaking decor and costumes (by Vittorio Nino Novarese, who went on to dress the most elephantine of Hollywood epics) are as strong a dramatic presence as the actors themselves. That’s no slight against the cast: Gassman was as great an actor as Marcello Mastroianni; Sanson and Canale are as strong as they are sensual, as gutsy as they are glamorous – a world away from the insipid sex objects that decorate most action movies! Read More »

Jerry Thorpe – The Venetian Affair (1967)

Quote:
After an American diplomat inexplicably explodes a bomb during an international peace conference in Venice, killing himself and everyone in the room, CIA boss Frank Rosenfeld calls ex-agent Bill Fenner in on the case. Fenner is forced to find his ex-wife and save her from the clutches of both the good guys and the bad guys, while still obtaining the Vaugiroud report and uncovering the bombing conspiracy. Read More »