Animation

Tex Avery – Wild and Woolfy (1945)

“Wild and Woolfy”
M-G-M 8 Mins. Very Funny
In this Technicolor cartoon the wolf, a desperate bandit who rides a contortionist horse, holds up the Good Rumor man for two popsicles, tries to kidnap a beautiful entertainer in a Western saloon, has the sheriff’s posse running ragged in a merry chase, but is always thwarted in his plans by a midget character who rides a midget horse. Read More »

Joaquín Cociña & Cristóbal León – La casa lobo AKA The Wolf House (2018)

The stories come in layers. There’s the one narrated at the start, about the joyful community of Germans living in dignity in the south of Chile. It may be set to wholesome archive footage of mountains and rosy cheeks, but even the narrator mentions the rumours, the other, less savoury tales that also circulate. There’s the story that appears as text on the screen, of a girl from the colony, Maria, who fled into the forest to avoid punishment, it in turn involves three little pigs and a big bad wolf. Then there’s the narrative that takes up the bulk of the film, the story of what happens once Maria enters the house she finds in the woods, rendered in intricate, mesmerising stop motion animation. Read More »

Enki Bilal – Immortel (Ad Vitam) AKA Immortal (2004)

Synopsis:
This movie is set in the year 2095, hence the presence of mutant humans and extraterrestrials. The main character is known as Jill. She is not human. When she is discovered by Dr. Elma Turner she is diagnosed as being the most interesting genetic test subject Turner has ever come across. Her organs are not in the right place, she has no memory and her internal biological age appears to be only three months old. Turner gives her a break, giving her an identity card and a place to stay, in exchange for Jill being her guinea-pig to work on and discover more about. Nicopol is a frozen prisoner who is due to be released a year after the film is set. There is a problem in the frozen prisoners’ ward and several are thrown down to the ground(dying in the process), including Nicopol, but he lives and only loses a leg. Read More »

Vatroslav Mimica – Tifusari AKA Typhoid Victims (1963)

The film was inspired by Jure Kaštelan’s famous war poem Tifusari. Aleksandar Marks’s woodcut-style drawings graphically depict hallucinations of sick partisans marching through wastelands. Read More »

Ferenc Cakó – Stones AKA Kövek – Stones (2000)

An Artist violently grinds stones and uses the sand to create animated drawings. His first picture is the Garden of Eden. Once Eve becomes pregnant, all the tribulations of the real world are unleashed upon her. She follows through dream-like sequences populated with crying birds, brick-wall-faced bureaucrats and pensive philosophers in seemingly petrified poses. Irritated, repressed and allured by each other, the creatures on the screen start living a life of their own. Gradually, a dark climax builds up. Will the Artist himself be able to handle so much emotional intensity? Written by helge79 Read More »

Michael Schaack – Felidae [+Extras] (1994)

Francis, a tomcat, and his “can opener,” a writer of pulp romances, move into a new neighborhood, where a feline serial killer appears to be on the loose.

Gifted with an inquisitive temperament beyond that of the typical house cat, he befriends a battle-scarred and foul-mouthed tom by the name of Bluebeard, who shares the belief of the other cats in the neighborhood that the bloody murders are the work of a human. Francis thinks that the evidence points to another cat, and sets out to sniff out the culprit. Read More »

Chris Marker – Lettre de Sibérie (1957)

Quote:
Chris Marker’s ethnographic essay-documentary on Siberia, made in 1957, remains fresh and relevant today. Combining fantasy animation (of woolly mammoths and mammoth buildings) and documentary photography shot by Sacha Vierny, Marker displays above all his amazement at the diversity of Siberia, at once almost pre-historic and post-revolutionary. On the film’s revival at the 1982 New York Film Festival, Village Voice critic Carrie Rickey called it “compassionately detached, playful and eclectic…. What still thrills about Letter from Siberia 25 years after it was made is Marker’s sympathetic ethnography, so much against the grain of the partisan American documentaries of the ’50s where the omniscient voice told you how to read each image.” In one hilarious segment, Marker does include that voice – repeating a scene with a Capitalist-propaganda voice-over and then with a Soviet one. Read More »