Animation

Paul Grimault – Le roi et l’oiseau aka The King and the Mockingbird (1980)

Quote:
Le Roi et L’Oiseau (The King and the Mockingbird) is one of the true classics of animation in France, and although its renown and popularity haven’t made it across to this side of the channel, it has been a source of inspiration to many of the current generation of Japanese animators. Scripted by the celebrated poet, Jacques Prévert (who also scripted Quai de Brumes and Les Enfants du Paradis), designed by the master of French animation, Paul Grimault, based on a story by Hans Christian Anderson, Le Roi et L’Oiseau’s credentials are impeccable and its reputation unassailable. Read More »

    Marcell Jankovics – Fehérlófia (1981)

    Quote:
    The history of Hungarian animation begins in 1914 and carries through to the modern day. Starting with short promotional cartoons prior to the two World Wars, Hungarian animation underwent a sporadic and halting development during the turbulent war years which were characterized in large part by the emigration of much of the field’s top talent. This exodus slowed dramatically during the 1950s when the Hungarian Communist Party took power and the Iron Curtain took shape. Read More »

      Sébastien Laudenbach – La jeune fille sans mains AKA The Girl Without Hands (2016)

      Summaries
      A poor miller gets tricked by the Devil and accidentally sells his daughter for a bit of gold. But Satan can’t take her because she’s too pure and has wept on her hands. So Satan orders the miller to cut her hands off. It’s the beginning of the young girl’s journey towards freedom. Read More »

        Chuck Jones – Duck Amuck (1953)

        Quote:
        The short-tempered Daffy Duck must improvise madly as the backgrounds, his costumes, the soundtrack, even his physical form, shifts and changes at the whim of the animator. Read More »

          Bruno Bozzetto – Allegro non troppo (1976)

          Bruno Bozzetto’s parody and spin-off of Disney’s Fantasia is a collection of animated sketches accompanying classical music pieces (by Debussy, Dvorak, Ravel, Sibelius, Stravinsky, and Vivaldi), with live-action slapstick sequences featuring cowriter Maurizio Nichetti (The Icicle Thief). It’s not only a hilarious send-up of Disney’s excesses but a splendid cartoon feature in its own right–funny and imaginative and lively. The “restored” version of this 1976 Italian picture includes more Nichetti footage and a stereo sound track. Read More »

            Raoul Servais – Chromophobia (1966)

            Synopsis:
            ‘The grey legions invade the world of colour to establish their colourless dominance. Resistance appears in the shape of a scarlet jester, who restores the reign of colour using his chromatic trickery.’
            – Raoul Servais Foundation Read More »

              Ub Iwerks & Walt Disney – Steamboat Willie (1928)

              Quote:
              Mickey Mouse, piloting a steamboat, delights his passenger, Minnie, by making musical instruments out of the menagerie on deck.

              Quote:
              The cartoon is considered the debut of Mickey Mouse and his girlfriend Minnie. Steamboat Willie is especially notable for being the first Disney cartoon with synchronized sound, as well as the first cartoon to feature a fully post-produced soundtrack which distinguished it from earlier sound cartoons Read More »