Animation

Aleksandr Petrov – The Old Man and the Sea (1999)

The Old Man and the Sea is a 1999 paint-on-glass-animated short film directed by Aleksandr Petrov, based on the novel of the same name by Ernest Hemingway. The film won many awards, including the Academy Award for Animated Short Film. Work on the film took place in Montreal over a period of two and a half years and was funded by an assortment of Canadian, Russian and Japanese companies. French and English-language soundtracks to the film were released concurrently. It was the first animated film to be released in IMAX. Read More »

Morimi Murano – Unico: Maho no shima e aka Unico in the Island of Magic (1983)

Quote:
Imagine this: You hear a knock on your door. A thin man wearing an overly large cape glides in. He creates dolls out of wood, and flowers out of people’s heads. Suddenly, he tells you to be quiet, and with an eerie hollow piano stroke, his large haired head slides into frame, typical anime style. Then, a large bubble man appears and turns you into wood. And you are wood. Read More »

Osamu Tezuka – Unico (1981)

This is a fantasy-animated film featuring the adventures of Unico, a Unicorn child. Unico uses magic to make whoever loves him happy. Nishikaze (“nymph of the west wind”) and the kitten named Chao, who wants to be a wizard, are eye-catching characters. “Cat on a broom” and “Lonely Unico” were chosen for this animated film from among many original stories. Read More »

David Hand – Bambi (1942)

Wikipedia wrote:
In a forest thicket, a doe gives birth to a fawn whom she names Bambi. After he learns to walk, Bambi befriends Thumper, a young rabbit; then, while learning to talk, Bambi meets a young skunk whom he calls “Flower” (the skunk says that he does not mind this name at all, and the infant Bambi says, “Flower, pretty Flower”). Read More »

Jules Bass – Mad Monster Party? (1967)

Synopsis:
When Dr Frankenstein decides to retire from the monster-making business, he calls an international roster of monsters to a creepy convention to elect his successor. Everyone is there including Dracula, The Werewolf, The Creature, Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde and many more. But Frankenstein’s title is not all that is at stake. The famous doctor has also discovered the secret of total destruction that must not fall into the wrong hands! Read More »

Ben Sharpsteen & Hamilton Luske – Pinocchio (1940)

“Pinocchio” is a parable for children, and generations have grown up remembering the words “Let your conscience be your guide” and “A lie keeps growing and growing until it’s as plain as the nose on your face.” The power of the film is generated, I think, because it is really about something. It isn’t just a concocted fable or a silly fairy tale, but a narrative with deep archetypal reverberations. (“Cinderella,” “Beauty and the Beast” and “The Lion King” share that quality, and so do the scenes involving Dumbo and his mother.) Read More »

Pierre Kast & Chris Marker – La Brûlure de mille soleils AKA The Heat of a Thousand Suns (1965)

This ultimate masterpiece is set in the far future where a young man, bored by his surroundings, blasts off into space with only his cat and some robots for company. On a distant planet he discovers a serene, tranquil culture and falls in love with a girl. The story follows his problems adjusting to their sociological standards and customs where family units are comprised of sexual groups of eight people. Read More »