Animation

Stanislav Látal – Dobrodruzství Robinsona Crusoe, námorníka z Yorku aka Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, a Sailor from York (1982)

IMDB:
A full-length picture based on the famous novel by Daniel Defoe. The picture, unlike the other film adaptations of the story, focuses much more on Crusoe’s life before and after his stay on the island. Following the principle of setting the novel right, it describes Crusoe’s experiences with delicate irony and understanding.
—KrátkýFilm Read More »

Michel Ocelot – Azur et Asmar (2006)

From Rotten Tomatoes
Once upon a time, there were two children who had the same nanny: Azur, blonde and blue-eyed, son of the lord of the castle, and Asmar, dark-skinned and black-eyed, the nurse’s child. Brought up like brothers, the children are suddenly torn apart. But Azur, haunted by the legend of the Djinn the nanny used to tell him, intends to find it in lands beyond the seas. When they grow up, the two foster brothers each go separate ways in search of the fairy. Daring rivals, they find magic lands in a medieval Maghreb, full of dangers and enchantments. Read More »

Svend Methling – Fyrtøjet AKA Magic Lighter (1946)

The first animated feature film made in Europe. Read More »

Suzan Pitt – Asparagus (1979)

An an animated candy colored nightmare from indie artist Suzan Pitt. Read More »

Martin Rosen – Watership Down (1978)

A group of rabbits flee their doomed warren and face many dangers to find and protect their new home.

Criterion essay:
Watership Down delivers all the stuff of a solid animated adventure. Its visual style is naturalistic, even cautious, but often quietly lovely. There’s clever interplay among the nervous Fiver, the gently heroic Hazel, and the blowhard Bigwig, and there’s some genuinely funny comedy involving Zero Mostel’s extravagantly accented seagull. The climactic battle is ingenious and exciting. General Woundwort is one of the truly scary cartoon villains. That solidity gives us a comfortable place to stand while the story opens up to less familiar terrain. Read More »

Tex Avery – Wild and Woolfy (1945)

“Wild and Woolfy”
M-G-M 8 Mins. Very Funny
In this Technicolor cartoon the wolf, a desperate bandit who rides a contortionist horse, holds up the Good Rumor man for two popsicles, tries to kidnap a beautiful entertainer in a Western saloon, has the sheriff’s posse running ragged in a merry chase, but is always thwarted in his plans by a midget character who rides a midget horse. Read More »

Joaquín Cociña & Cristóbal León – La casa lobo AKA The Wolf House (2018)

The stories come in layers. There’s the one narrated at the start, about the joyful community of Germans living in dignity in the south of Chile. It may be set to wholesome archive footage of mountains and rosy cheeks, but even the narrator mentions the rumours, the other, less savoury tales that also circulate. There’s the story that appears as text on the screen, of a girl from the colony, Maria, who fled into the forest to avoid punishment, it in turn involves three little pigs and a big bad wolf. Then there’s the narrative that takes up the bulk of the film, the story of what happens once Maria enters the house she finds in the woods, rendered in intricate, mesmerising stop motion animation. Read More »