Argentina

Pablo Trapero – Leonera aka Lion’s Den (2008)

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We will never know if the young university student that one day wakes up surrounded by two men covered in blood, one dead, the other wounded, is the perpetrator. Julia is pregnant with the child of one of them. The maternity ward of a women’s prison is the location in which most of the 113 minutes of Leonera’s plot takes place. Shot in Buenos Aires’ prisons, with the participation of true inmates and guards, the film “maintains some of the codes of prison films, although developed in the context of the relationship between Julia, the mother and her son”, explained Trapero in an interview with BBC Mundo. Read More »

Ernesto Baca – Samoa (2005)

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Ernesto Baca is an argentinian experimental filmmaker that uses a super 8 camera and a cutting room to create images and sounds as an artisan (like the work of Stan Brakhage, for example). Baca’s images often refer to a profound connection with Indian culture and religion. Read More »

Sebastián Borensztein – Un cuento chino AKA A Chinese Tale (2011)

The film opens idyllically when a Chinese man, Jun (Ignacio Huang), takes his girlfriend on a boat trip on a picturesque lake to propose to her. This image is quickly shattered when a cow falls from the sky, killing Jun’s girlfriend. The shattering of Jun’s happiness and the serene scene becomes a precedent for the rest of the film. It is this event which will ultimately change the life of bad tempered iron monger Roberto (Darín). Read More »

Maximiliano Schonfeld – Germania (2012)

In a small town of Entre Ríos, a German family is preparing to leave their farm, for reasons that will only be revealed much later. On the last day, the two teenage brothers, Brenda and Lucas, say goodbye to their friends while their mother closes up the house. But that sent-off is far from exposing what affects the characters’ lives and drama in words and events. Going back to the setting and tone of his short film Invernario, Maximiliano Schonfeld eludes the cliché of describing local habits and tales us to a rough world that always show more than what it actually features. Read More »

Eduardo Mignogna – La fuga (2001)

Quote:
Argentinean helmer Eduardo Mignogna is best known for mellers like the award-winning “Autumn Sun” (1996) and “The Southern Lighthouse” (1998), but the ambitiously-structured crowd pleaser “The Escape,” based on his own novel, shows him extending his range almost too far. Pic pays the dramatic price for mixing popular genres — including jail-bust thriller, meller and gangster drama — and, though well-crafted and entertaining, sometimes feels contrived and manipulative. Final sensation is of a great story cannily told, and these simple old-fashioned virtues, plus the current interest in Latino cinema, could be enough to generate offshore interest outside standard Latino territories. Read More »

Leonardo Favio – Juan Moreira (1973)

AllMovie wrote:
In this amazing and complex Argentine historical drama, much of the true story of the 19th-century assassin Juan Moreira comes to the screen. At the time of its release, this Argentine film was the most popular locally made film ever to be shown there. Juan Moreira was a popular folk hero on a par with Billy the Kid in the U.S., and many stories and songs have been written about him over the years. In the movie, the innocent herdsman Moreira (Rodolfo Beban) is thrown into jail at the behest of an important cattle-baron. He emerges from jail a changed man. After killing the cattleman who had him sent to jail, he at first hides among a tribe of native peoples then moves into a brothel. Read More »

Juan Taratuto – La reconstrucción (2013)

Eduardo is an obsessive, efficient worker in the oil industry, disconnected from any type of emotion. He seems to have enclosed his history in one of the rooms of the house in which he lives in Rio Grande. His lonely routine is altered when he is called to go to Ushuaia for a few days. Getting there and meeting an old friend and his family becomes a real test in his life and opens a door that allows him to rebuild his past, his present and, perhaps, his future. Read More »