Juan Taratuto – Papeles en el viento AKA Papers in the Wind (2015)

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When Alejandro “Mono” dies, his brother and two closest friends, a tight-knit group since childhood, are left to figure out how to take care of his young daughter, Guadalupe. They want to give her all the love they felt for Mono and secure her future, but there isn’t a single peso left in the bank. Mono invested all of his money in a promising soccer player whose promise hasn’t panned out, and the three hundred thousand dollars Mono spent on his transfer is soon to be lost for good. How do you sell a forward who can’t score a goal? How do you maintain relationships when repeated failures create fissures in lifelong loyalties? Fernando, Mauricio, and “Ruso” pool the few resources in their arsenal to come up with strategies in their desperate attempt to recoup Mono’s investment for Guadalupe. Papers in the Wind is a tribute to friendship and proof that love and humor can triumph over sadness. Continue reading

Matías Piñeiro – Todos mienten AKA They All Lie (2009)

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A group of girls and boys in their twenties settle in a country house that seems completely isolated from civilization. One of them writes a novel while the others try to become a gang and prepare a robbery; some fall in love, or seem to be, or believe (or say) they are in love. But these two, three, ten plot lines unfold from what the characters hide or just don’t know, connecting the writing of the novel and the forming of the gang, and the past of two of the characters with that of the house, and of those who perhaps were the two most bitter enemies of nineteenth century Argentine history… With a sense of humor and play that is both the character’s and the film’s, Todos mienten superimposes plot lines as if it were a tapestry from which a part is constantly hidden, revealing it later and changing its meaning, by means of a complot of specialists in pretense that asks the audience to become an accomplice. Brilliant, vital, with an extraordinary depuration and economy of film resources that makes systematic long takes not seem like a prison, but the result of a necessity, Todos mienten is the joy of cinema in its purest form. –BAFICI Continue reading

Matias Piñeiro – El hombre robado aka The stolen man (2007)

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This is the first movie of Argentinian director Matias Piñeiro who won lot of festivals and was reviewed in Cahier du cinema.

Synopsis

In the sentimental fantasy that love is mixed with, work with reading, writing and reading with writing the love and all together and separate from and at times all the time, in its way, with Theft: Fraud, theft, fraud and plagiarism.
The book in the Army Campaign Grande Domingo Faustino Sarmiento is the armor key to this story which is organized around Mercedes Montt, argentina young guide who works at the Museo de Arte Español Enrique Larreta, but it occupies his spare time in the passionate reading of the text sarmientino applied to a liberal sentimental life and work of those around her: her partner, Leandro Lopéz Jordan, his girlfriend, Leticia Lamadrid, the boyfriend of her friend, Andres Rademil and suspected friend of the groom friend, Clara Virasoro. Continue reading

Juan José Campanella – El Hijo de la novia aka Son of the Bride [+Extras] (2001)

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A great feel-good type of film. Campanella lives up to promise and delivers yet again, as he dives head first into the story of a forty-something going through a mid-life crisis. Ricardo Darin (Rafael Belvedere) shows us why he’s one of South America’s biggest stars as he puts in a performance to rival “Nine Queens” (another great Argentinian film). He’s complemented by Natalia Verbeke who plays his girlfriend (and who is in possession of the world’s greatest smile) and Héctor Alterio and Norma Aleandro who play his parents. Aleandro in particular contributes some magnificent scenes, playing an aged woman struggling to cope with mental illness. A really good film that will restore your faith in humanity….A bit corny?? oh well…. Funny, original, and well put together. Recommended for everyone!! Continue reading

Damián Szifrón – Relatos Salvajes AKA Wild Tales (2014)

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A story about love deception, the return of the past, a tragedy, or even the violence contained in an everyday detail, appear themselves to push them towards the abyss, into the undeniable pleasure of losing control.

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The first ten minutes of Argentina’s Wild Tales, nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at this year’s Oscars, perfectly set you up for the experience you are about to have. A woman boards an airplane, then strikes up a conversation with the man across the aisle from her. It turns out he knows her ex-boyfriend. So does the woman seated in front of him. So does everyone else on the plane. It’s too much to be a coincidence, and it’s not. The guy they all know is the pilot; his passengers are people who have done him wrong. The scene ends with a stunning Twilight Zone-esque twist, then segues into an opening credits sequence set against photos of wild, often predatory animals. Writer/director Damian Szifron grabs you by the throat from the get-go, then proceeds to deliver a dazzling ride. Continue reading

Raúl Perrone – Favula (2014)

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“Hypnotic” is the best word to describe Favula, the latest work from director Raúl Perrone, which comes with a recommendation from none other than Apichatpong Weerasethakul – though he used the more Joe-like epithet, “bliss.” Somewhat of a secret outside of his native Argentina, Perrone has made more than 30 movies, and in recent years has reinvented his cinema, by looking back to the past, and in doing so pointing to the future. Standing apart from any other film made this year, with its magical handmade aesthetic, Favula recalls Méliès, or silent Fritz Lang, but at the same time evokes recent silent, stage-bound aesthetics like Raya Martin’s Independencia. Loosely based on an African fable, and shot employing rear-projections techniques, Favula’s simple events take place mostly in an isolated house and a nearby jungle: a marginal family’s life is interrupted by the arrival of a teenaged girl. On top of the minimalist, pulsating images, Perrone layers a maximalist soundtrack that encompasses both the sounds of the jungle and non-diegetic music (indelible contemporary songs that appeared in his last work, the cumbia punk opera P3ND3JO5). The result is a wholly unique, mythical universe of danger, passion and magic. Continue reading