Arne Mattsson – Vaxdockan aka The Doll (1962)

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summary
A night watchman (Per Oscarsson) in Stockholm interrupts a burglary and finds a mannequin that he takes home; in his mind, it’s a beautiful and very much alive woman. Director Arne Mattsson knows how to use the shadows of black-and-white cinematography to chilling effect; that along with Oscarsson’s performance elevate this psychological look at loneliness and mental illness. The star must have studied Anthony Perkins in Psycho (1960); he looks like him and plays his character in a similar fashion. Behind the youthful façade lies insanity. Gio Petré is credible in the transition between doll and human. ~ Movie Hamlet. Continue reading

Arne Mattsson – Hon dansade en sommar AKA One Summer of Happiness (1951)

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Better known as One Summer of Happiness, Hon Dansade en Sommar was the most popular and financially successful of Swedish director Arne Mattson’s romantic films. Based on the novel by Per Olof Ekstrom, the story revolves around the romance between college graduate Goran (Folke Sundquist) and farmer’s daughter Kerstin (Ulla Jacobsson). Their plans to marry are stymied by the opposition of a local clergyman (John Elfstrom). Only after a devastating tragedy occurs does Goran realize the folly of allowing others to make decisions for him. Though Arne Mattson could have spent the rest of his career turning out Bergmanesque exercises like this one, he decided to switch creative gears and concentrate on Hitchcockian thrillers.
Hal Erickson Continue reading

Arne Mattsson – Hon dansade en sommar aka One Summer of Happiness (1951)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Plot Synopsis from AMG

Better known as One Summer of Happiness, Hon Dansade en Sommar was the most popular and financially successful of Swedish director Arne Mattson’s romantic films. Based on the novel by Per Olof Ekstrom, the story revolves around the romance between college graduate Goran (Folke Sundquist) and farmer’s daughter Kerstin (Ulla Jacobsson). Their plans to marry are stymied by the opposition of a local clergyman (John Elfstrom). Only after a devastating tragedy occurs does Goran realize the folly of allowing others to make decisions for him. Though Arne Mattson could have spent the rest of his career turning out Bergmanesque exercises like this one, he decided to switch creative gears and concentrate on Hitchcockian thrillers.
Hal Erickson Continue reading