Eric Rohmer – 4 aventures de Reinette et Mirabelle (1987)

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In 4 adventures of Reinette and Mirebelle directed by Eric Rohmer in 1987 the main protagonists are two girls of very different character. Reinette is a country girl, rough and direct, but at the same time very sweet. Mirabelle is city girl, more contemplative and intellectial. They happen to meet by accident in the country and spend a few days together, after which Mirabelle invites Reinette, who wants to stydy painting in Paris, to stay in her apartment. Following this the two friends venture on four “adventures” which all turn around the theme of speech and silence. Continue reading

Guy Maddin – Careful (1992)

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Quote:If art-school preciosity were doled out in bottles, the name on the label would be Guy Maddin. A campy fusspot who tricks out unengaging yarns with silent-movie gimmicks and tons of bric-a-brac, Maddin has made a name for himself as a collagist “visionary,” a picker and sifter through the archaeological remains of the Dawn of Cinema.

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Guy Maddin’s dizzily delirious 1992 film, Careful, has been called a pro-repression fable, a masterpiece of deadpan comic timing, a period piece evoking a time and place that never existed, and a Ricola ad gone horribly, horribly wrong.1 Utterly unique and yet evocative of myriad influences, Careful is a truly bizarre concoction created from the plundered relics of cinematic history and the dark attics of dreams. Continue reading

Pedro Aguilera – Naufragio aka Wreckage (2010)

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Illegal immigration is one of the most challenging problems facing Spain over these
last few years. From among the thousands of immigrants entering the country by
various means, there are hundreds and hundreds trying to reach Spanish territory on
rudimentary open-decked vessels, most of them setting out from along the African
coast. Many of these African immigrants fail to reach Spain and find their death in the
sea. Others reach the coast exhausted and dehydrated from days on the open sea and
yet still hoping to find a new future. For many, there is no future as they are promptly
returned to their land of origin and even those who are allowed remain for whatever
reason, find that things are much more difficult for them than they had ever expected. Continue reading

Chantal Akerman – Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1976)

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In the unnerving silence of a sparsely furnished kitchen in Brussels, a poised, anonymous middle-aged woman (Delphine Seyrig) – identified only through the title of the film as Jeanne Dielman – completes her food preparation, places the contents into a large cooking pot on the stove, reaches for a match, lights the burner, and with chronological precision, finishes replacing the matchbox from its original location as the doorbell rings, switching the lights off as she leaves the room. The scene then cuts to an unusually framed shot of a truncated Jeanne at the entrance of the apartment as she accepts a hat and coat from an unidentified guest (Henri Storck) before retreating, out of view, into a bedroom at the end of the hallway. Moments later, the obscured image is reconnected to a familiar referential framing of the darkened hallway as the unknown guest re-emerges from the room and prepares to leave, handing Jeanne a pre-arranged sum of money before confirming their next appointment for the following week. She deposits the money in a soup tureen in the dining room, then returns to the kitchen to attend to the boiling pot, before tidying the bedroom and meticulously bathing and changing clothes after the encounter. And so Jeanne’s monotonous daily ritual unfolds through the tedium of household chores, impersonal sexual transactions, trivial errands, and alienated conversations with her son, Sylvain (Jan Decorte), revealing the silent anguish of disconnection and systematic erosion of the human soul. Continue reading

Tony Guzman – Philosophy in the Bedroom (1995)

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This comedy chronicles the experiences of Juliette, a young woman who undergoes a deep exploration of her sexuality as she is given a series of special lessons in sex and philosophy by the extremely decadent Dolman. During the course of an evening Dolman helps demolish Juliette’s conservative ideology and replaces it with his own libertine perspectives. Juliette becomes an enthusiastic convert in this bicentennial production of the Marquis de Sade’s classic book. ~ WorldCat
This orally erotic drama is inspired by the writings of the Marquis de Sade. It is oral in the sense that all of the sexual action is explicitly discussed, but never seen on screen. At one point Mr. Dolman begins reading chapters from his sexual journal. At another juncture, the uptight mother of a recently deflowered virgin shows up. To show her mother all she’s missed, the daughter involves her in an orgy that has her mother committing sodomy, incest, lesbianism, and adultery simultaneously. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi Continue reading

Simon Aboud – Come Here Today (2008)

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Alex takes on a poignant journey that examines his relationships with lover, brother and mother on his way to an emotional reconciliation with his father. Alex’s take on life is surprisingly crystal clear for a man who has lived life to the full. It is only in the moment of death that one can truly grasp the meaning of life. ~imdb Continue reading