Arthouse

Parviz Kimiavi – Baghé sangui AKA Garden of Stones (1976)

Synopsis:
Darvish Khan, a deaf-mute shepherd living in the desert, has a mystical vision in a dream in which he encounters a saint. When he awakens, he finds himself clutching a large stone. Grateful for the vision, he aims to pay homage and begins to construct an unusual monument in its honor. After his wife tells a neighbor that it is miraculous place, news of his ‘garden of stones’ spreads and people from neighboring villages come to see it. The result wreaks havoc upon Darvish Khan’s life. Bagh-e Sangi won the Silver Bear prize for the best film at the 1976 Berlin Film Festival and was shown at the Tehran, London and Paris film festivals. It was recently included at #20 on a list of the 27 best Iranian films, as selected by 14 Iranian directors for the 2014 Fribourg International Film Festival. Read More »

Lav Diaz – Melancholia (2008)

Melancholia (Lav Diaz, 2008)

Lav Diaz’s Melancholia is an eight-hour meditation of sorts on the maddening persistence of sadness in this world, can logically be divided into three parts and an epilogue. The first part details the experiences in Sagada of Julian (Perry Dizon), Alberta (Angeli Bayani) and Rina (Malaya Cruz) as they refashion themselves into different drastic identities as part of the radical process that Julian created in order for them to cope with the losses of their loved ones. The second part is set in Manila, with Julian and Alberta living their real lives and addressing the scenarios and situations that accompany their melancholic predicament. Read More »

Mahamat-Saleh Haroun – Abouna (2002) (720P)

Quote:
Abouna is a gently heartbreaking look at the lives of two boys growing up impoverished and fatherless in Chad. Filmmaker Mahamat-Saleh Haroun mixes in telling bits of documentary realism with his story of the two boys’ lackadaisical search for their father. The filmmaker takes his time with the tale, lingering on details, like a long shot of the two boys meandering across a field, roughhousing and walking on their hands. Haroun also pointedly displays posters for Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid, Idrissa Ouedraogo’s Yaaba, and Jim Jarmusch’s Stranger Than Paradise outside the little movie theater that the boys visit. Read More »

Carlos Alberto Prates Correia – Cabaret Mineiro (1980)

Focusing on the culture and beliefs of the people in the state of Minas Geraes in Brazil, this highly innovative drama by director Carlos Alberto Prates-Correia continuously blurs the line between fantasy and reality. At center stage is a man and his life, viewed from the perspective of his dreams, visions of the past, interpretations of the present, and a “real” world somewhere in-between. Cultural and social vignettes from life in Minas Geraes are interspersed throughout the film; the avant-garde approach of Prates-Correia contorts some of these vignettes into enigmas. Read More »

Gan Bi – Di qiu zui hou de ye wan AKA Long Day’s Journey Into Night (2018)

Synopsis:
Luo Hongwu returns to Kaili, the hometown from which he fled many years ago.He begins a search for the woman he loved, and whom he has never been able to forget. Read More »

José Luis Torres Leiva – El viento sabe que vuelvo a casa AKA The Winds Know That I’m Coming Back Home (2016)

Quote:
Looking for extras and locations, a filmmaker settles on Chiloé, the second largest island off the coast of Chile. He does auditions, but mainly listens patiently to the stories of young and old people. As an outsider, he cautiously searches for the soul of the community and its underlying tensions. Read More »

Philippe Garrel – Un Ange Passe (1975)

Un Ange Passe is a portrait of Philippe Garrel’s father, Maurice. “I made it so it didn’t cost too much. I made it very quickly. It turned out to be a film that looked exactly like it costs — it was industrially just right. But it was also useful to do to show love to my father.” —Philippe Garrel Read More »