Arthur Penn

Arthur Penn – Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

Synopsis:
1934. Young adults Bonnie Parker, a waitress, and Clyde Barrow, a criminal just released from prison, are immediately attracted to what the other represents for their life when they meet by chance in West Dallas, Texas. Bonnie is fascinated with Clyde’s criminal past, and his matter-of-factness and bravado in talking about it. Clyde sees in Bonnie someone sympatico to his goals in life. Although attracted to each other physically, a sexual relationship between the two has a few obstacles to happen. Read More »

Arthur Penn – The Miracle Worker (1962)

Synopsis:
Young Helen Keller, blind, deaf, and mute since infancy, is in danger of being sent to an institution. Her inability to communicate has left her frustrated and violent. In desperation, her parents seek help from the Perkins Institute, which sends them a “half-blind Yankee schoolgirl” named Annie Sullivan to tutor their daughter. Through persistence and love, and sheer stubbornness, Annie breaks through Helen’s walls of silence and darkness and teaches her to communicate. Read More »

John Frankenheimer & Arthur Penn – The Train (1964)

In 1944, a German colonel loads a train with French art treasures to send to Germany. The Resistance must stop it without damaging the cargo. Read More »

Arthur Penn – The Missouri Breaks (1976)

 photo 0AkyJEF.jpg

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Synopsis from Timeout.com:
A wonderfully quirky Western, brilliantly scripted by Thomas McGuane, which strips all the cute whimsy away from the Butch Cassidy theme (outlaws on the run from a relentless lawman), replacing it with a kind of pixillated terror. Playing the ‘regulator’ as a camp Buffalo Bill with an Irish accent, Brando makes his entrance playing peekaboo from behind his horse, and at one point even stalks his prey in a dress and poke bonnet. But he is also a legalised killer, expert with a rifle but preferring (as the flail of God) to use a harpoon shaped like a crucifix. And as his gloating sadism shades into hints of bizarre perversion when he dedicates a love song and a kiss to his horse, the tone gradually darkens to a kind of horror. It’s one of the few truly major Westerns of the ’70s, with a very clear vision of the historical role played by fear and violence in the taming of the wilderness. Read More »

Arthur Penn – Night Moves (1975)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Synopsis wrote:
When Los Angeles private detective, Harry Moseby is hired by a client to find her runaway teenage daughter, he stumbles upon a case of murder and artifact smuggling.

Vincent Canby wrote:
Arthur Penn’s Night Moves, the director’s first film since the epic Little Big Man five years ago, is an elegant conundrum, a private-eye film that has its full share of duplicity, violence, and bizarre revelation, but whose mind keeps straying from questions of pure narrative to those of the hero’s psyche. Read More »

Arthur Penn – Alice’s Restaurant (1969)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/23/Film_Poster_for_Alice%27s_Restaurant.jpg

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Arlo Guthrie’s song is converted into a motion picture.
Arlo goes to see Alice for Thanksgivng and as a favor takes her trash to the dump. When the dump is closed, he drops it on top of another pile of garbage at the bottom of a ravine. When the local sheriff finds out a major manhunt begins. Arlo manages to survive the courtroom experience but it haunts him when he is to be inducted into the army via the draft. The movie follows the song with Arlo’s voice over as both music and narration.
Read More »

Arthur Penn – The Chase (1966)

Free Image Hosting at www.ImageShack.us

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Quote:
A cluttered, erratic, uncertain movie (1966)–and, if you can see past the blowsy trappings of southern gothic, a good one. Robert Redford is the Christ-like convict who escapes from prison and heads toward his small-town home; his expected arrival (get it?) stirs a flurry of moral and social upheaval. Marlon Brando, as the sheriff, provides a gradually crumbling center of strength and certainty; the balance of the extraordinary cast includes Jane Fonda, Angie Dickinson, Janice Rule, James Fox, Robert Duvall, E.G. Marshall, and Miriam Hopkins. The screenplay is by Lillian Hellman; the direction, nervous and attentive, is Arthur Penn’s. Read More »