Thomas Leitch – Crime Films (2002)

 Thomas Leitch   Crime Films (2002)

Focusing on ten films that span the range of the twentieth century, Thomas Leitch traces the transformation of three figures common to all crime films: the criminal, the victim and the avenger. He shows how the distinctions among them become blurred throughout the course of the century, reflecting and fostering a deep social ambivalence towards crime and criminals. The criminal, victim and avenger characters effectively map the shifting relations between subgenres (such as the erotic thriller and the police film) within the larger genre of crime film. Continue reading

Paul Newland – Don’t Look Now: British Cinema in the 1970s (2010)

 Paul Newland   Dont Look Now: British Cinema in the 1970s (2010)

While postwar British cinema and the British new wave have received much scholarly attention, the misunderstood period of the 1970s has been comparatively ignored. Don’t Look Now uncovers forgotten but richly rewarding films, including Nicolas Roeg’s Don’t Look Now and the films of Lindsay Anderson and Barney Platts-Mills. This volume offers insight into the careers of important filmmakers and sheds light on the genres of experimental film, horror, rock and punk films, as well as representations of the black community, shifts in gender politics, and adaptations of television comedies. The contributors ask searching questions about the nature of British film culture and its relationship to popular culture, television, and the cultural underground.
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Gönül Dönmez-Colin – Cinemas of the Other (2006)

 Gönül Dönmez Colin   Cinemas of the Other (2006)

amazon says:
An original collection of recent interviews with filmmakers whose works represent the trends in the film industries of their respective countries. Preceding the interviews, the author provides an introduction delineating historical information regarding the film industries of the countries included in the book.

Each interview comprises of stills from important films discussed and a bio/filmography of the artist. In addition to creative concerns, the focal point of the interviews is to position the filmmaker within the social or political context of their respective country. The striking variety in approaches towards each interview creates a rich diversity of tone and an overwhelming impression of animation within the text. Cinemas of the Other offers a carefully researched and detailed first-hand account on the developments and trends in specific regional film industries.
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Linda Williams – Porn Studies (2004)

SIWguIu Linda Williams   Porn Studies (2004)

In “Hard Core: Power, Pleasure, and the “Frenzy of the Visible”, Linda Williams put moving-image pornography on the map of contemporary scholarship with her path-breaking analysis of the most popular and enduring of all film and video genres. Now, fifteen years later, she showcases the next generation of critical thinking about pornography and signals new directions for study and teaching.”Porn Studies” resists the tendency to situate pornography as the outer limit of what can be studied and discussed. It moves beyond futile feminist debates and distinctions between a ‘good’ erotica and a ‘bad’ hard core. With revenues totalling between ten and fourteen billion dollars annually – more than the combined revenues of professional American football, basketball, and baseball – this volume acknowledges that visual, hard-core pornography has emphatically arrived as a central feature of American popular culture. It is time, Williams contends, for scholars to recognize this and give pornography a serious and extended analysis. The essays in “Porn Studies” exemplify this effort. The contributors examine varieties of pornography from the tradition of the soft-core pin-up through the contemporary hard-core tradition of straight, gay, and lesbian videos and dvds to the burgeoning phenomenon of pornography on the internet.They explore, as examples of the genre, individual works as divergent as The Starr Report, the pirated Tommy Lee/Pamela Anderson honeymoon video and explicit Japanese ‘ladies comics’ consumed by women. Continue reading

Noam Chomsky vs Michel Foucault – Human Nature: Justice versus Power [Excerpt] (1971)

v0zb Noam Chomsky vs Michel Foucault   Human Nature: Justice versus Power [Excerpt] (1971)

International Philosophers’ Project 1971

Interviewer: Fons Elders

Aired on Dutch television, hence the additional subs. Debate took place in the US according to this.

Quote:
In 1971, American linguist/social activist Noam Chomsky squared off against French philosopher Michel Foucault on Dutch television … the program was entitled ‘Human Nature: Justice Vs. Power’ and offered sharp contrasts between the more traditional view of ‘human nature’ and what would become a postmodernist perspective … Chomsky, following a rationalist lineage going back to at least Plato, believes that there is a foundational ‘nature’ and that its positive aspects (love, creativity, recognizing and embracing justice) must be realized, while Foucault remains skeptical of any such notion… for him, the issue is not so much whether ‘justice’ or ‘human nature’ ‘exists,’ but how they have historically (and currently) function in society … in regard to justice, he says (this is not included in the clips): “… the idea of justice in itself is an idea which in effect has been invented and put to work in different types of societies as an instrument of a certain political and economic power or as a weapon against that power…” The point of any political struggle, for Foucault, is to alter the ‘power relations’ in which we all find ourselves (youtube user hiperf289) Continue reading

Richard Koszarski – Film History: An International Journal – Exploitation Film (1994)

 Richard Koszarski   Film History: An International Journal   Exploitation Film (1994)

The subject of Film History is the historical development of the motion picture, and the social, technological, and economic context in which this has occurred. Its areas of interest range from the technical through all aspects of production and distribution.

With this issue on the Exploitation Film, Film History investigates one of the more obscure corners of cinema. If there is a grand narrative of film history, the exploitation film has not had its chapter therein. There are many reasons for this. This ‘Exploitation Film’ issue demonstrates the scholarly activity devoted to this marginal mode of film production and its position in regard to main- stream forms of cinematic production and representation. Continue reading

pixel Richard Koszarski   Film History: An International Journal   Exploitation Film (1994)