Books

Akira Kurosawa – Something Like An Autobiography (1983)

Something Like an Autobiography
by Akira Kurosawa

Published by Vintage | 1983 | 205 pages

Description:

Quote:
Among Japanese film makers, no one is perhaps as universally known as Akira Kurosawa.

“Something like an Autobiography” is an account of the legendary director’s early life. It is only a partial account, encompassing his childhood, adolescenct years, the early years of his film career, up to the point of Rashomon. Nonetheless, the book benefits anyone keen for understanding the man behind such remarkable films as Seven Samurai, Ikiru, Rashomon, and Dersu Uzala among others. Kurosawa’s films were – Stuart Galbraith IV writes in the introduction to his book “The Emperor and the Wolf” – first and foremost, deeply humanist pictures, films which effortlessly transcend cultures and centuries. Something like an Autobiography helps one understand the evolution of the artist Kurosawa, the influences that shaped his vision. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard – A Conversation with Jean-Luc Godard (1968)

Here`s a long Godard interview from 1968 where he not only gives interesting insides into his La Chinoise but also talks about Foucault, Roland Barthes, Bergman`s Persona,
Pasolini and much more.

Here are some quotes:

Quote:

That’s precisely why we’re
trying to make movies so that future Foucaults
won’t be able to make such assertions with quite
such assurance. Sartre can’t escape this reproach,
either. Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard and Youssef Ishaghpour – Cinema: The Archaeology of Film and the Memory of a Century (2005)

Reviews
‘ . . .the greatest living cinematic artist, the wisest, most transformative, most original agent provocateur at work in the fields of cinema? The short answer: sans doute. Godard is to his medium what Joyce, Stravinsky, Eliot, and Picasso were to theirs: rule-rewriting colossi after whom human expression would never be quite the same.’
The Village Voice

‘It’s possible to hate half or two-thirds of what Godard does – or find it incomprehensible – and still be shattered by his brilliance.’ Pauline Kael
Read More »