Bulgaria

Rangel Vulchanov – Slantzeto i syankata AKA Sun and shadow (1962)

The first love between two very different characters is the prism through which we are shown the point of view of the film-makers who denounce war and plead for simple human happiness. Read More »

Binka Zhelyazkova – Privarzaniyat balon AKA The Tied Up Balloon (1967)

A barrage balloon appears unexpectedly over a Bulgarian village. The startled villagers decide to knock it down with a fusillade. But the balloon flies off to the mountains. The villagers, armed to their teeth, set off after it. But they are not alone in this undertaking. There is another armed group that chases the wonder. An argument whose property the balloon is breaks out between the two groups. It turns out that the balloon flew from Romania over the Danube River. In the turmoil following the argument, the balloon is destroyed. The police arrive and punish the villagers for meddling in other peoples affairs. Read More »

Kamen Kalev – Iztochni piesi AKA Eastern Plays (2009)

Quote:
Two brothers who have lost all contact are suddenly brought together when they have opposite roles in a racist beating: while Georgi who’s recently joined a neonazi group participates in the violence, Itso witnesses and rescues the Turkish family. Georgi, now being asked to participate in larger events, starts to question his implication in the movement and Itso wonders if the beautiful Turkish girl he saved could be his ticket out from his sad life in Sofia. Only by reuniting will the two brothers be able to assess what they really want from life. Read More »

Svetla Tsotsorkova – Sestra AKA Sister (2019)

Quote:
In a small town in present-day Bulgaria, a mother and her two daughters are struggling to survive. The dreamy and distracted younger daughter often invents stories to make life more interesting. Unwittingly, she eventually gets caught in a web of her own lies and destroys her older sister’s well-ordered materialistic world. While struggling to get to the facts, the two sisters find out the truth about their mother. Read More »

Milko Lazarov – Ága (2018)

Quote:
In a yurt on the snow-covered fields of the North, Nanook and Sedna live following the traditions of their ancestors. Alone in the wilderness, they look like the last people on Earth. Nanook and Sedna’s traditional way of life starts changing – slowly, but inevitably. Hunting becomes more and more difficult, the animals around them die from inexplicable deaths and the ice has been melting earlier every year. Chena, who visits them regularly, is their only connection to the outside world – and to their daughter Ága, who has left the icy tundra a long time ago due to family feud. When Sedna’s health deteriorates, Nanook decides to fulfill her wish. He embarks on a long journey in order to find Ága. Read More »

Vulo Radev – Kradetzat na praskovi AKA The Peach Thief [+Extras] (1964)

synopsis
In this Bulgarian drama, a POW interred in a camp slyly sneaks peaches from a colonel’s orchard. During one illicit foray, he meets the colonel’s wife and they become lovers. When the colonel orders the prisoners moved, the POW becomes determined to stay with the wife. During the march he escapes in hope of convincing her to run with him, but ends up killed by a guard who has been ordered to protect the peach trees from raiders.by Sandra Brennan Read More »

Konstantin Bojanov – Avé AKA Ave (2011)

Quote:
Two troubled teens hitchhike across Bulgaria.

Quote:
Avé (Anjela Nedyalkova) and Kamen (Ovanes Torosian) meet on the road, hitchhiking toward Ruse in northern Bulgaria for different and ultimately unclear reasons. He wears a black leather jacket over a blue hoodie with the hood up; she wears a red jacket atop a black hoodie, a brown cap on her head. Little is made of the clothes in the dialogue that begins to build between the two strangers, but the way they dress, along with a few other seemingly minor directorial choices and scriptural contrivances, denote Konstantin Bojanov’s Avé as something more memorable and fascinating than a great deal of modern road movies, never mind post-adolescent romances. Read More »