Jean-Pierre Dikongue-Pipa – Muna Moto (1975)


Ngando and Ndomé share an extremely perfect love. Yet, tradition demands a dowry for Ndomé’s hand that Ngando, an orphan, cannot afford. Forced to ask his uncle for assistance, Ngando finds himself at the mercy of his uncle’s lust and greed.

Muna Moto AKA The Child of Another (1975) is Cameroon’s first feature-length film. It is a classical story of doomed loved told in an African context. It is directed by Jean-Pierre Dikongue Pipa and features gorgeous black-and-white cinematography.
It won the 1975 FESPACO prize for best African film and was featured in Sight & Sound’s “75 Hidden Gems: The Great Films Time Forgot” in which 75 critics were asked to pick one film each that they considered “unduly obscure and worthy of greater eminence.
Mostra of Venice: official selection(1975). Continue reading

Florence Ayisi & Kim Longinotto – Sisters in Law (2005)


Two legal crusaders from Kumba, Cameroon, determined to see that justice is served and make a difference from within the system, are the focus of this documentary from filmmakers Kim Longinotto and Florence Ayisi. Vera Ngassa is a prosecutor unafraid to take on unpopular causes, and Beatrice Ntuba is a judge who doesn’t hide her outrage when a case rubs her the wrong way. Unlike many legal workers, Ngassa and Ntuba vow to actively include themselves in the lives of those who seek justice. From the caring consideration shown to a young girl who has obviously suffered abuse at the hands of her parents to the noble support shown to a battered Muslim woman brave enough to take her husband to court for spousal abuse, the support shown by Ntuba and Ngassa to their clients is unparalleled, and offers a ray of hope to those who may feel that all is lost. Continue reading

Jean-Marie Teno – Afrique, je te plumerai AKA Africa, I Will Fleece You (1993)

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This documentary of repressive political realities in Cameroon begins with the 1990 publication of an open letter to President Biya calling for a national conference – and the immediate arrest of the letter’s author and publisher. The narration then examines the nation’s colonial history, beginning with the first German missionary in 1901, the establishment of schools, French occupation following World War I, the paucity of books written by and published by Cameroonians, and the repression of the CPU, a leftist organization of the 1950s and 1960s. Cameroon and its people are the lark, its feathers plucked first by colonialism and then by native strongmen: ‘Alouette, je te plumerai.’ Written by jhailey Continue reading