Camp

Rosa von Praunheim – König des Comics – Ralf König AKA King of Comics (2012)

Synopsis: Ralf König, one of the most successful German cartoonists, became famous with his comic book “The Most Desired Man,” which was made into a film starring Til Schweiger back in 1994. Wittily playing with queer clichés, he also reaches a wide heterosexual audience. In King of Comics, busy filmmaker Rosa von Praunheim (The Einstein of Sex, I Am My Own Woman, Rent Boys) portrays an unpretentious and modest man whom, with brilliant observational skills, has left his outlandish, yet intelligent, incredibly fun and delightfully graphic mark on an entire generation. Read More »

Frank Simon – The Queen (1968)

Queen is a ribald hour-long documentary about a “Miss All-American Beauty” contest held in New York in 1967. So what, you say? Well, it happens that all the contestants are male transvestites — and some of them are real knockouts. Alternately hilarious and depressing, Queen was considered the cutting edge of obscene outrageousness when originally distributed by Grove Press (the publishers of several above-the-counter “alternative” magazines of the 1960s). Nowadays it’s practically kid stuff, thanks to the surfeit of TV tabloids and Fox Network sitcoms.allmovie.com Read More »

Gilles Carle – Les mâles AKA The Males (1971)

Quote:
After 553 days of self-imposed solitude in the wilderness, Emile the poet and St-Pierre the lumberjack head for the nearest town to fulfill the demands of nature, they must find a woman. A nearly fatal experiment in kidnapping brings “the males” running back to their camp, where they find that a woman has come to them voluntarily. With civilization now safely out of reach, they try to set up a perfect, harmonious threesome. Read More »

Anna Biller – A Visit from the Incubus (2001)

Lucy, (Anna Biller) a young Victorian woman in the Old West, is being tormented by nightly visits from an incubus (a horrible demon who has sexual intercourse with sleeping women). Her friend Madeleine (Natalia Schroeder) tries to console her, but is unable to help. A fallen woman, Lucy gets a job singing at the local saloon. However, the Incubus (Jared Sanford) has followed her there; and things take an unexpected turn as Lucy and the Incubus, amidst the rowdy cowboys and saucy can-can girls, have their final showdown. With beautiful period costumes and sets by director Anna Biller that are borrowed from 1950’s Technicolor films, plus big hairdos, weird musical numbers, and plenty of great character actors, this Horror-Western-Musical has all of the elements of a cult classic. Read More »

Anna Biller – Viva (2007)

Quote:
Writer-director-pouter Anna Biller’s influences are as naked as her delightfully curvaceous body is in the riotous 1970s throwback Viva. Biller’s film is to the films of Radley Metzger and Russ Meyer what Todd Haynes’s Far from Heaven was to Douglas Sirk, only perhaps a little bit cannier and a lot less dryly academic about its postmodern tweaks; if Haynes looked back at the 1950s by making his own Rock Hudson update a blue-blooded queer, Viva revisits the golden age of stag filmmaking by putting its likely audience (bored suburbanites with a 16mm projector in their shag-carpeted basement dens) in the starring roles. Read More »

Bruce LaBruce – Otto; or Up with Dead People (2008)

Quote:
From maverick director Bruce La Bruce comes the horrific and subversive smash of the Berlin and Sundance film festivals – Otto. A young zombie named Otto appears on a remote highway. He has no idea where he came from or where he is going. He hitches a ride to Berlin where he is discovered by underground filmmaker Medea Yarn. Fascinated, Medea decides to film a documentary with Otto as her subject. When Otto discovers that there is a wallet in his back pocket that contains information about his past, before he was dead, he begins to remember a few details, including memories of his ex-boyfriend, Rudolf. Otto arranges to meet him with devastating results. Savagely sexual and overtly gruesome Otto is a true original. Read More »

Werner Nekes – Johnny Flash (1986)

Synopsis: The unemployed electrician Juergen Potzkothen (Helge Schneider) lives with his mother (Andreas Kunze) and dreams of happiness as a pop singer. When he presents a demo tape to the artist agent Terrence Toi (also Andreas Kunze), he is -rather coincidentally- dedicated and gets the artist’s name Johnny Flash. But the music editor Cornelia Dom wants him for her music broadcast commitment too. Naive Juergen now stands inbetween the emerging rivalry of both music agents and their commercial interests. Ultimately, however, he gives the vocal performance in Tois broadcast and hits the big breakthrough to a large overnight star. Read More »