Camp

Desmond Davis – Smashing Time (1967)

Synopsis:
Two young women from England’s northern counties; the plain Brenda and the flamboyant Yvonne, arrive in London to find fame and fortune. Misdirected and separated, they strike out on their own with Yvonne becoming a model and Brenda a waitress. After Brenda sabotages Yvonne’s date whom takes advantage of her, they lose their jobs and soon the roles are reversed with Brenda succeeding as a model and Yvonne becoming a waitress. With both of them competing with the other, they soon learn that they have to team up to take on their adversaries in order to succeed. Read More »

John Waters – Polyester (1981)

Quote:
For his first studio picture, filth maestro John Waters took advantage of his biggest budget yet to allow his muse Divine to sink his teeth into a role unlike any he had played before: Baltimore housewife Francine Fishpaw, a heroine worthy of a Douglas Sirk melodrama. Blessed with a keen sense of smell and cursed with a philandering pornographer husband, a parasitic mother, and a pair of delinquent children, the long-suffering Francine turns to the bottle as her life falls apart—until deliverance appears in the form of a hunk named Todd Tomorrow (vintage heartthrob Tab Hunter). Enhanced with Odorama™ technology that enables you to scratch and sniff along with Francine, Polyester is one of Waters’ most hilarious inventions, replete with stomach-churning smells, sadistic nuns, AA meetings, and foot stomping galore. Read More »

Manuel Toledano – Shampoo Horns (1998)

IMDB:
Sensationalistic group portrait of New York City ”club kids,” makes you long for those good old days when Andy Warhol’s self-appointed superstars brought a certain humor and bohemian sense of style to his semi-improvised films. Read More »

Bethel Buckalew – Sassy Sue (1973)

IMDB:
At the happy Willard ranch, a moonshiner father decides to teach his son a lesson or two about women, however, no one can come between Junior and his Sassy Sue. Read More »

Alfred Vohrer & Samuel M. Sherman – Die blaue Hand AKA Creature With the Blue Hand (1967)

Die blaue Hand is a pretty wild movie on its own terms. It crams a lot of bizarre digressions into a mere 74 minutes, not counting some stuff reportedly inserted after the fact by an American distributor. You get a room full of hanging mannequins, a butler who reveals himself as the disgruntled ex-husband of the Emerson materfamilias, and a second inspection of the insane stripper, on top of everything I’ve already mentioned. If Kinski recedes during the story, Karl Lange emerges as an awesome looking villain in the Germanic Caligari tradition of evil asylum keepers, while Diana Koerner makes Myra an appealing heroine. Visually, even in something well short of restored form, Hand looks great in moody, Bava-influenced color, and the admitted datedness of the music is a point in the film’s favor as far as I’m concerned. Read More »

Ken Russell – The Lair of the White Worm (1988)

Quote:
Ken Russell’s Lair of the White Worm uses Dracula author Bram Stoker’s final novel as the basic springboard into a surreal and dark-humored tale concerning a bizarre cult and a series of sacrificial murders in honor of an ancient pagan god. When archeologist Angus Flint (Peter Capaladi) discovers the mysterious scull of an undiscovered beast, further investigation reveals a bizarre myth concerning a medieval knight slaying a fearsome dragon. Soon making the acquaintance of Lord James D’Ampton (Hugh Grant), the conquering knight’s descendant, Flint begins to learn of local lore surrounding the creature and soon discovers that, throughout the years, many unexplained disappearances have haunted the local populace. Read More »

Bruno Mattei – Robowar – Robot da guerra (1988)

A clone/mix of PREDATOR, RAMBO, and ROBOCOP gone nuts jungle flick with an international cast, exotic locale and good electronic music. Read More »