Canada

Michael Snow – Wavelength (1967) (HD)

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“Wavelength” was shot in one week in December, 1966, preceded by a year of notes, thoughts, mutterings. It was edited and first print seen in May, 1967. (The Film-Makers’ Cooperative)

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I wanted to make a summation of my nervous system, religious inklings, and aesthetic ideas. I was thinking of, planning for a time monument in which the beauty and sadness of equivalence would be celebrated, thinking of trying to make a definitive statement of pure Film space and time, a balancing of “illusion” and “fact,” all about seeing. Read More »

Claude Jutra – Mon oncle Antoine AKA My Uncle Antoine (1971)

All Movie.com Plot Synopsis by Hal Erickson
With Mon Oncle Antoine, actor Jean Duceppe established himself as Canada’s principle purveyor of eccentric relatives. Playing the uncle of 15-year-old Jacques Ganon, Duceppe acts as the lad’s confidante through the difficult coming-of-age process. The Canadian backwoods and the mining-town milieu of the 1940s are displayed to excellent nostalgic advantage in this retrospective piece from writer/director Claude Jutra (who also plays a supporting role). Though relatively unknown in the states (and often dismissed as unremarkable by below-the-border critics), Mon Oncle Antoine is regarded as a classic of the Canadian Cinema. The film won an unprecedented eight statuettes at the 1972 Canadian Film Institute Awards, including best picture and best director. Read More »

Paul Almond – Isabel (1968)

A woman believes she is beginning to lose her mind when she begins seeing ghosts and spirits.

As a comment on religious repression, familial ostracism, and subliminal incestuous urges, this film might have some value. Read More »

Brandon Cronenberg – Possessor AKA Possessor: Uncut (2020)

Tasya Vos works for a secretive organization, which uses brain implant technology to inhabit other people’s bodies, for the purpose of driving them to commit assassinations. Before long, Tasya not only experiences the aftermath of this cruel task, but also encounters a more complex host than usual. Read More »

Bob Balaban – Parents (1989)

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Michael Laemie (played by Brian Madorsky) is a young boy living in a typical 1950’s suburbanite home… except for his bizarre and horrific nightmares, and continued unease around his parents. Especially his father, Nick Laemie (played by Randy Quaid). Young Michael begins to suspect his parents are cooking more than just hamburgers on the grill outside. Read More »

Mario Azzopardi – Deadline (1980)

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Deadline casts a deadly serious eye at the oft-maligned horror genre with a plot that chronicles the mental unraveling of horror author and screenwriter Steven Lessey (Stephen Young, The Clown Murders), who is under constant pressure to surpass the gruesome imagery of his previous work. With a producer hounding him for his latest script, a debilitating case of writer’s block and a university film student who accuses him of peddling “horseshit horror,” Steven’s overwhelming anxieties eventually cause him to lose his grip on reality. While trying to conceive of the most terrifying feat ever to spice up his screenplay, he begins to lapse into blood-drenched daydreams of murder and gore. As these flights of gothic fancy get more disturbing, Steven is increasingly able to ignore the turmoil ripping apart his own family—not only has his wife started having an affair, but she’s also developed a cocaine habit, and his kids have become insolent and disrespectful. Read More »

Barbara Sternberg – Beating (1995)

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“Beating” — to get beaten or give a beating, to beat oneself up. To beat the odds. Metal is forged by beating. Birds beat their wings, the sun beats down, and our hearts… Under this central trope of ‘beating’, with its combined negative and positive implications, the film brings together the individual personally lived and the communal, historic perspective; hatred and forgiveness; laughing and crying. Also brought in relation: the politics of gender and the holocaust; the Old World and North America. Passages of emotion – our lives as we experience them today – move through a terrain of memory and anlaysis. Read More »