Chile

Raoul Ruiz – La colonia penal aka The Penal Colony (1970)

Quote:
A foreign journalist arrives on a small Pacific island 200 miles off the coast of South America. Once a leper colony, the island was later transformed into a prison and then, under U.N. mandate, made into an independent republic. Yet despite democratic structures, the inhabitants–who speak a strange dialect composed of Spanish and English–still obey the old prison rules. After sending back detailed accounts of the torture and repression seen everywhere, the journalist realizes that she”s fallen into the trap created for her by the islanders: lacking natural resources, the island”s main export is news. The clearest anticipation of Ruiz”s later European work, The Penal Colony is a powerful document of the tensions and contradictions in Chile in the months before Allende”s electoral victory. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Cofralandes, cuarta parte: Evocaciones y valses (2002)

This is the fourth in a series of seven projected video essays (four of which were completed) that Ruiz was commissioned to make in 2002-2003 for use among Chilean community organizations and broadcast on public television. Cofralandes, the head-title for each of the segments of Ruiz’s series, is taken from a song by Violeta Parra where it evokes the “land of milk and honey,” the “land of Cockayne,” the “green world” imagined by Gonzalo in The Tempest. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Cofralandes, segunda parte: Rostros y rincones (2002)

This is the second in a series of seven projected video essays that Ruiz was commissioned to make in 2002-2003 for use among Chilean community organizations and broadcast on public television. Cofralandes, the head-title for each of the segments of Ruiz’s series, is taken from a song by Violeta Parra where it evokes the “land of milk and honey,” the “land of Cockayne,” the “green world” imagined by Gonzalo in The Tempest. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Cofralandes, tercera parte: Museos y clubes en la región antártica (2002)

Quote:
For more than twenty years the films of Ruiz have led us into the fields of uninhibited delirium, free associations, and intricate games of collage. Ruiz, paying no heed to conventions, leads his audience into a labyrinth without a map, without warning and without an Ariadne allowed to help them retrace their steps. “Regulars only” seems to be the imperative which thrusts us into his creative world. However, it is a playful attitude that he proposes. Labyrinth, yes, but devouring monster, no — except the one we assemble ourselves from the fragments of mirrors that Ruiz has left scattered on the road. These fragments, their selection and random order, is indeed the art of Ruiz. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Cofralandes, rapsodia chilena: Hoy en día AKA Chilean Rhapsody (2002)

Quote:
Ruiz is no lover of documentary. But the opportunity to make an essay-film offering his ‘observations of Chile’ produced in him a mammoth work, recently shown in seven parts on Chilean television. Shooting with a digital camera, Ruiz refinds the mobility and mercuriality of his early Chilean work. But he is also able to explore anew the transmutation of reality into fiction: Chile becomes the imaginary country of Cofralandes, ‘a popular version of paradise, a folkloric paradise. In the beginning there is a song about a place where poor people can live without poverty, and they can eat everything – even the houses. The rivers are made of wine.’ Read More »

Alejandro Fernández Almendras – Matar a un hombre AKA To Kill A Man (2014)

A working class man who, tired of being the victim of criminals, decides to take justice in his own hands. Read More »

Raoul Ruiz – Palomita blanca AKA Little White Dove (1973)

Quote:
A relic of the Popular Unity period where we find a teacher talking to himself about the horror of the education system; the hard heartedness of the far right; the frivolity of the left; and a legion of the downtrodden. It is a film about verbal violence; life as a soap opera; and such dreams as mediocre movies are made on. Indecipherable to the world, but a Rosetta Stone for Chilean hieroglyphs. Read More »