Hal Hartley – Henry Fool (1997)

 Hal Hartley   Henry Fool (1997)

thgc Hal Hartley   Henry Fool (1997)

Plot summary:

Socially inept garbage man Simon is befriended by Henry Fool, a witty roguish, but talent-less novelist. Henry opens a magical world of literature to Simon who turns his hand to writing the ‘great American poem’. As Simon begins his controversial ascent to the dizzying heights of Nobel Prize winning poet, Henry sinks to a life of drinking in low-life bars. The two friends fall out and lose touch until Henry’s criminal past catches up with him and he needs Simon’s help to flee the country. Continue reading

Hal Hartley – Amateur (1994)

 Hal Hartley   Amateur (1994)

thgc Hal Hartley   Amateur (1994)

Quote:
Isabelle is an ex-nun waiting for her special mission from God. In the meantime, she is making a living writing pornography. She meets Thomas, a sweet, confused amnesiac who cannot remember that he used to be a vicious pornographer, responsible for turning his young wife, Sofia, into the world’s most notorious porn queen. Sofia’s on the run, convinced she’s killed him. Together, Isabelle and Thomas set out to discover his past, a past waiting to catch up with him.

Hal Hartley fans, rejoice! For his forth feature, Amateur, the non-mainstream director of The Unbelievable Truth, Trust, and Simple Men has once again stayed far from the embrace of Hollywood. Those unfamiliar with Hartley’s style might mistakenly tag this movie with a “bad” label, but, really, all the overblown elements are entirely intentional. If nothing else, the director — referred to as America’s closest thing to a “European auteur” — is known for being quirky and inventive in both dialogue and character presentation. Like many independent film makers, Hartley will not compromise to pander to a larger audience. Continue reading

Edward F. Cline – Hook, Line and Sinker (1930)

 Edward F. Cline   Hook, Line and Sinker (1930)

thgc Edward F. Cline   Hook, Line and Sinker (1930)

Plot Synopsis
The comedy team of Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey made their fourth film appearance of 1930 in the hectic comedy-melodrama Hook Line and Sinker. This time the boys are cast as itinerant insurance salesmen Wilbur Boswell and J. Addington Ganzy (“Not Pansy — Ganzy, with a ‘G’”!) After talking their way out of a traffic ticket, Wilbur and Addington make the acquaintance of penniless socialite Mary Marsh (Dorothy Lee), who is fleeing a wealthy marriage arranged by her mother Rebecca (Jobyna Howland). Falling in love with Mary himself, Wilbur talks Ganzy into helping her renovate a seedy hotel willed to her by her uncle. With the dubious aid of a decrepit bellboy (George F. Marion) and a nutty house detective (Hugh Herbert), the boys turn the hotel into a thriving enterprise. The plot thickens when a gang of jewel thieves and a band of bootleggers register at the hotel, followed in short order by Mary’s mother and the girl’s prospective fiance, lawyer John Blackwell (Ralf Harolde) — who happens to be in league with the bootleggers! A wild gangland shoot-out and nocturnal chase caps this dated but amusing Wheeler and Woolsey vehicle.
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Axel Ranisch – Dicke Mädchen aka Heavy Girls (2012)

hqqp1i Axel Ranisch   Dicke Mädchen aka Heavy Girls (2012)

thgc Axel Ranisch   Dicke Mädchen aka Heavy Girls (2012)

Quote:
Sven lives with his mother Edeltraut, who is suffering from dementia. He shares his entire life, the apartment, even the bed with her. During the day he works at a bank. While he is at work, Daniel comes to the apartment to look after Edeltraut. He takes her to hairdresser’s, goes for walks, shopping, and tidies up the apartment. But one day while Daniel is cleaning the windows, Edeltraut locks him out on the balcony and takes off. The two men go out looking for her. But what they find is not just Edeltraut, but also a tender fondness for one another, one which turns both of their lives upside down. Production note: “HEAVY GIRLS” was completed in just three months, from the original idea to the finished film. The film was shot based on a treatment, which defined the order and content of the scenes, the dialogues were improvised. In order to attain the greatest amount of creative freedom and authenticity, we intentionally shot the film without a crew and film team and with a simple Mini DV camera. Continue reading

I.S. Johar – Johar Mehmood in Goa (1965)

l8n732 I.S. Johar   Johar Mehmood in Goa (1965)

thgc I.S. Johar   Johar Mehmood in Goa (1965)

Synopsis

Mary and Peter fall in love with each other and are about to get married, when Peter is asked to re-join his regiment to go to war. Shortly thereafter, he is missing, believed to be dead, leaving behind a devastated Mary who subsequently gives birth to twins, and leaves them on the doorsteps of two Goan households, and becomes a nun. Twenty four years later, India is a free country, while Goa is under the rule of the Portugese, Mary is the Mother Superior; Peter, who is still alive, is the Deputy Superintendent of Police in Goa, who has been entrusted the task of apprehending two revolutionaries by the name of Ram and Rahim – none other than his very own sons. Watch what happens when duo unleash a series of attacks against the oppressive Portugese regime, including robbing the Bank of Portugal, disrobing an arrogant Superindent of Police, Alburqueue, then setting his house on fire, joining hands with dreaded bandit Daler Singh, and abducting the daughter of the Goa’s Hakim, Rita. Continue reading

Frank Ross – The Lady Says No (1952)

theladysaysnocover Frank Ross   The Lady Says No (1952)

thgc Frank Ross   The Lady Says No (1952)

Plot:
A woman writes a best-selling book for women warning them about the “dangers” of men. A handsome photographer for a national magazine arrives in her town to do a feature story on her. Complications ensue.

The lady of the title is author Dorinda Hatch (Joan Caulfield), who writes a scathing best-seller in which she trashes all men. Photographer Bill Shelby (David Niven) vows to make Dorinda eat her words, thereby proving the superiority of the male of the species. Suffice to say that he doesn’t succeed–at least until the very, very end. The middle portion of The Lady Says No consists of a surrealistic dream sequence in which Dorinda realises that she loves Bill despite his rampant chauvinism. This film is not a likely candidate for screening at the next N.O.W. meeting. Lady Says No was produced and directed by Frank Ross, who at the time was married to star Joan Caulfield.
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pixel Frank Ross   The Lady Says No (1952)