Corneliu Porumboiu – Al doilea joc AKA The Second Game (2014)

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The Second Game (Romanian: Al doilea joc) is a 2014 Romanian documentary film directed by Corneliu Porumboiu. The film integrally depicts the Dinamo — Steaua footbal derby played on December 3, 1988; the game is commented on by Porumboiu and his father, Adrian, the referee of that match.

It was selected for the Forum section at the 64th Berlin International Film Festival. Continue reading

Corneliu Porumboiu – Când se lasa seara peste Bucuresti sau metabolism AKA When Evening Falls on Bucharest or Metabolism (2013)

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Focused on a director and his leading actress while they are off the set. They discuss the discrepancies between film and digital cinema, Western and Eastern food, and try to capture an unfiltered (and seemingly impossible) sense of “reality” on film.
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Corneliu Porumboiu – A fost sau n-a fost? aka 12:08 East of Bucharest (2006)

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Synopsis:
One romanian newsman attempts to put his nation’s revolution on the air after the fact in this satiric comedy from writer and director Corneliu Porumboiu. It’s the sixteenth anniversary of the revolt that removed Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu from power in Romania, and Jderescu (Ion Sapdaru) is the host of a televised public affairs show who wants to do a special program on the revolution. Jderescu’s idea is to bring on a handful of ordinary citizens to discuss their role in Ceausescu’s overthrow and how their lives have changed since Communist rule was swept from Romania. However, Jderescu can only round up two guests for his broadcast — elderly Piscoci (Mircea Andreescu), who’s more interested in playing Santa Claus for the neighborhood kids than talking politics, and Manescu (Teo Corban), a schoolteacher nursing a brutal hangover. As Jderescu tries to lead a serious discussion of how Romania has changed since Ceausescu was driven from power, the conversation wanders off on a tangent about where the revolution actually took place, and the waters become even more muddied when Jderescu opens up the phone lines for questions from viewers, most of whom have their own distinct (and strongly conflicting) memories of the Revolution . . . (allmovie) Continue reading