Crime

Terence Fisher – Wings of Danger (1952)

Quote:
“A former pilot suffering from blackouts discovers that a fellow flyer is suspected of being mixed up with a web of smugglers. While searching for his missing buddy, he unwittingly becomes entangled in a morass of suspicion!” Read More »

Alan Clarke – Scum (1979)

Quote:
Alan Clarke first released Scum in 1977 as a BBC TV-film, yet the BBC disapproved of the film due to the amount of raw, harrowing realism which had been packed into a short running-time. Therefore the BBC banned the version, and it was not until fifteen years later that the TV-version was aired on the UK’s Channel 4. Though, to get around not being able to release the TV version of Scum Alan Clarke opted in for developing a remade, feature-length version to be aired at cinemas, this was released in 1979. The film sent shockwaves through cinemas across Britain, causing huge controversy from the media, government and British public. Some people saw the film as a “visceral image of a flawed system”, while others saw the film as “exploitive trash in the form of a documentary”. Read More »

Edgar G. Ulmer – Detour (1945)

Review
“Detour” is a movie so filled with imperfections that it would not earn the director a passing grade in film school. This movie from Hollywood’s poverty row, shot in six days, filled with technical errors and ham-handed narrative, starring a man who can only pout and a woman who can only sneer, should have faded from sight soon after it was released in 1945. And yet it lives on, haunting and creepy, an embodiment of the guilty soul of film noir. No one who has seen it has easily forgotten it. Read More »

Alonso Ruizpalacios – Museo (2018)

Synopsis:
Juan and Benjamín, who are well into their thirties, do not seem to be prompt to finish their university degree in veterinary. As if that was not enough, they are not so keen to fly the nest any time soon either. Thirsty of some long and much sought-after renown, one ill fated Christmas Eve they decide to loot the iconic National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico. Read More »

João Canijo – Filha da Mãe AKA Lovely Child [+ Extras] (1990)

Quote:
The bitch is called Maria and she is a sweet child. She has no father and does not like her mother. She has a boyfriend who is a bandit who would like to change his class.

There are two more bandits: a very tall singer and a guy from Oporto who is a very short and a full of life’s experiences. Neither of these two do much thinking, one even less than the other. Read More »

Sharunas Bartas – Indigène d’Eurasie (2010)

Gena is under no illusions about his situation. In the prologue of the film, he briefly sketches out his life in a monotone voiceover: growing up without parents, receiving an “education” from his criminal uncle, initial protection money rackets in the wake of privatizations in the crumbling Soviet Union, later international drug dealing. His enemies are numerous but not easy to recognize; “life is short, the greater part of it already over”. Although there is only a small chance that Gena will be able to trade in his nomadic existence between Asia and Europe for a “normal life”, he takes the plunge anyway. A frantic chase across Europe thus ensues. Heading west, presumably towards the sun. Read More »

Claude Lelouch – La Vie, l’amour, la mort aka Life, Love, Death (1969)

Review Summary
The title Life Love Death (originally La Vie, L’amour, la Mort) pretty much runs the gamut of the subject matter which normally appeals to French filmmaker Claude Lelouch. Awaiting execution for murder, Souad Amidou reflects on the events leading up to this sorry contingency. It seems that Amidou can only cohabit with prostitutes, thus he seeks out satisfaction in all the side streets of Europe. Disturbed by a whore’s insults when he was unable to perform, Amidou goes completely off the deep end and begins cutting a swath of death from one end of Spain to another. Lelouch’s principal stylistic decision in Life Love and Death is to draw as many parallels as possible between sex and bullfighting. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide Read More »