Crime

Jean-Pierre Melville – Le Cercle Rouge AKA The Red Circle (1970)

Synopsis:
Master thief Corey (Alain Delon) is fresh out of prison. But instead of toeing the line of law-abiding freedom, he finds his steps leading back to the shadowy world of crime, crossing those of a notorious escapee (Gian Maria Volonté) and alcoholic ex-cop (Yves Montand). As the unlikely trio plots a heist against impossible odds, their trail is pursued by a relentless inspector (Bourvil), and fate seals their destinies. Jean-Pierre Melville’s Le cercle rouge combines honorable anti-heroes, coolly atmospheric cinematography, and breathtaking set pieces to create a masterpiece of crime cinema. Read More »

Jean Delannoy – Maigret et l’affaire Saint-Fiacre AKA Maigret and the St. Fiacre Case (1959)

Synopsis:
Inspector Maigret returns to his home town and is reminiscing over his past when he receives a call for help from the Duchess of Saint-Fiacre. She has just received an anonymous letter informing her that she will soon die. A short while later she does indeed die, from a heart attack. Convinced that she was murdered, Maigret begins his investigation…
– Films de France Read More »

Pilar Miró – Beltenebros aka Prince of Shadows (1991)

Madrid, 1962. More than twenty years after the civil war has finished, a communist comes back to Spain to kill a traitor. Read More »

André Barsacq – Le rideau rouge AKA Crimson Curtain (1952)

Quote:
Playwright Jean Anouilh was the guiding force behind the unorthodox murder mystery. During a provincial theatre production of Macbeth, several tragedies occur. The actors attribute these calamities to the “curse” supposedly hanging over the Shakespeare play, but police inspector Jean Brochard doesn’t buy this… Read More »

Steno – Copacabana Palace (1962)

This film is also known as “The Girl Game” and “Saga of the Flying Hostesses”. The film takes place during Carnival Time in Rio De Janeiro. As unconfined joy wafts its way through the streets, the lives of several fabulously wealthy visitors and a group of voluptuous stewardesses intersect, sometimes with startling results. Sylvia Koscina and Mylene Demongeot are among the visual delights of this garish romp. Featuring the music of Antonio Carlos Jobim. Read More »

Goran Rusinovic – Mondo Bobo (1997)

Quote:
A young man is forced to shoot a few thugs in self defence. Following the advice of his lawyer, he surrenders to the police and ends up in a mental institution. From there he escapes but his path soon becomes littered with corpses. Read More »

Tod Browning – The Unholy Three (1925)

Lon Chaney — the Man of a Thousand Faces — used his makeup skills, astonishing physicality and profound empathy to create Quasimodo, the Phantom of the Opera and more of the Silent Era’s greatest horror roles. In this hypnotic mix of creepiness and crime, he plays a ventriloquist who dons a granny disguise to team with a strongman and a little person in a bizarre robbery scheme that ends in murder. The film marks an even more fateful alliance than that of the Unholy Three: the collaboration between Chaney and director Tod Browning, who would helm seven more Chaney movies before making Sound Era horror history with Dracula and Freaks. Read More »