Cult

Nagisa Oshima – Max Mon Amour (1986)

“Just tell me one thing frankly. Is this monkey really your lover?”

It is and it isn’t unlikely material for Nagisa Ôshima. The element of transgressive love is here, but this time, it’s in a dry comedy whose centerpiece is a diplomat’s wife’s extramarital affair with a sensitive, somewhat unstable chimpanzee (aren’t they all?). Charlotte Rampling is the woman, Anthony Higgins is the diplomat, and Victoria Abril is the housekeeper who develops a mysterious allergy, probably but not necessarily to the titular Max. Read More »

Damon Packard – Night Pulse (2018)

Quote:
Damon Packard’s four-year in the making epic follows the exploits of husband/wife moguls trapped with a deadbeat couch potato brother in a hallucinogenic 1-900 world of 1991. Everyone is plotting to kill everyone else including themselves and ultimately do. Inspired by the corporate take-over era of the late 80s/early 90s and all the dark, atmospheric neo-noir thrillers that came along with it. Read More »

Pete Tombs & Andrew Starke – Mondo Macabro: Turkish Pop Cinema (2005)

Quote:
An informative 23-minute Mondo Macabro documentary on Turkish Pop Cinema, featuring interviews with living legend Cuneyt Arkin and director Yilmaz Atadeniz among others, along with plenty of footage to whet your appetite for more Turkish films. Read More »

Edward D. Wood Jr. – Crossroads of Laredo (1995)

Plot Synopsis
Definitely not to be confused with the 1949 Paramount release starring William Holden or the Larry McMurtry 1995 television mini-series, this 20 minute unfinished “western” marked the first helpless Hollywood effort of legendary bad filmmaker Edward J. Wood, Jr. Together with a friend, 18-year-old John Crawford Thomas, the 23-year-old Wood produced his little epic in 16 mm on a one-day shooting schedule at the Iverson Ranch in Chatsworth, California, apparently blowing Thomas’ inheritance in the process. A few other scenes ere filmed several weeks later in Griffith Park, but then Wood ran out of funds or acquaintances with ready cash (a recurring problem for the young auteur). Read More »

George Kuchar – The Devil’s Cleavage (1975)

Quote:
One of Kuchar’s few feature-length works is this ribald pastiche to postwar Hollywood melodrama, that period when the studios were trying very hard to be adult. The intricate, overheated plot involves a nurse trapped in an unhappy marriage who escapes the big city in search of greener pastures in Blessed Prairie, Oklahoma. Swerving from earnest homage to dark satire, Kuchar simultaneously imitates and savages the legacy of Sirk, Preminger and Minnelli that inspired him, gleefully intertwining the suggestive and the scatological, while also pointing towards the later postmodern parodies of Cindy Sherman. The Devil’s Cleavage is also a rich time capsule of 1970s San Francisco, replete with cameos from Curt McDowell and Art Spiegelman.
– The Harvard Film Archive Read More »

Anna Azevedo & Renata Baldi & Eduardo Souza Lima – Rio de Jano (2003)

Meet Rio de Janeiro… through the eyes of Jano!
Jean Leguay, working under the pseudonym Jano, is a pop French visual artist. He teamed up with Bertrand Tramber to create his first comic, ‘Kebra’, for the magazine B.D. in 1978. When the magazine folded, the ‘Kebra’ series was continued other magazines like Métal Hurlant, Charlie Mensuel, Rigolo, L’Echo des Savannes and Zoulou.

In late 2000, he visited Rio de Janeiro in order to make this book. Jano immersed himself completely in the “Rio de Janeiro life style”, going to places that will never be showed on post cards, meeting people from all layers of society, observing, experimenting, interacting. Read More »

Kunt Tulgar – Süpermen dönüyor AKA Turkish Superman (1979)

Synopsis:
After a mysterious prologue in a Christmas tree ornaments-filled “starscape”, Turkish Clark Kent is told by his parents that he is an Alien from space and that he must leave to accomplish his destiny. They give him a green gem which he takes into a nearby cave. There, Jor-El, minus half of his front teeth, appears and reveals to Clark that he is Superman… Read More »