Alexandru Tatos – Secvente AKA Sequences (1982) (DVD)

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Plot:
In this interesting drama, three sequences which could have formed separate stories are linked together, like cars on a train, to give a larger perspective on the nature of reality and film. The three episodes are joined together by one film crew at work on two different jobs. In the beginning, the crew is introduced as they juggle their dual roles as State-supported propagandists who laud their government and society, and as private movie makers working on their own film. Next, they are in a restaurant looking for suitable locations to film when the eatery’s owner, through no fault of his own, is induced to wax long and lugubriously on his miserable life. In the last segment, two extras are in the background of a scene, sitting at a table in a restaurant. It slowly becomes apparent to one of them that the man he’s sitting with tortured him more than 40 years ago at a Nazi concentration camp during World War II. Continue reading

Nick Donkin – The Junky’s Christmas (1993)

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Quote:
Based on the short story by Burroughs or the same name this is a short clay-mation released by Francis Ford Copolla.

Narrated by Burroughs, we follow Danny a junk sick and broke bum on his aimless wanderings to find that christmas fix, his eyes are sting and all he can feel is the raw ache in his bones, only the warming rush of Junk will make his at ease. Severed leg’s, drunk Doctors and and a 1/4 grain all go into making this a superb little tale that every family should gather round come christmas morning. Continue reading

Robert Downey Sr. – Pound (1970)

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Quote:
There’s something liberating about director Robert Downey’s films, even when by rights they should be put on a leash by their small budgets and settings. Never was the case truer than in POUND, the kind of project that major studios would run a mile from. Long out of circulation, Downey’s film populates a dog pound with different human characters who pace about their cage, uncertain about their future. Some wait in hope for their owners to redeem them, others plot to escape, but most wait to see if they will make it to the end of the day without getting ‘The Needle’. It seems like a cute gimmick to have human characters playing dogs, but Downey has never been one to play by the rules, even if they would provide an interior logic to his story. The dog-human switcheroo isn’t as straightforward as it should be: the first camera angle inside the pound shows us the characters as dogs, the second shows them again as people. But are we still to treat them as ‘dogs’? They have a TV set in their cage; can understand human speech; and are revealed in flashbacks as having human lives outside of the pound. Continue reading