Daniel Mann

Daniel Mann – Our Man Flint (1966)

Synopsis:
The world’s weather seems to have changed dramatically with violent storms everywhere and long dormant volcanoes suddenly erupting. No one is sure what is happening or why but when American intelligence chief Cramden loses yet another team of agents, there appears to be only one man who can do the job: Derek Flint, former super spy, incredibly rich and the ultimate ladies man. Despite Cramden’s concerns, Flint is on the job and soon discovers that the Earth’s weather is under the control of a secret organization known as GALAXY whose scientists are looking to pacify the world and devote humankind to scientific pursuits. Read More »

Daniel Mann – The Rose Tattoo (1955)

Based on Tennessee Williams’ play, The Rose Tattoo is the story of a Southern widow (Anna Magnani) who finally stops pining for her dead husband when she falls in love with a trucker (Burt Lancaster). Williams wrote his play and this adapted screenplay with Magnani in mind, and she earned an Academy Award for her performance. Read More »

Daniel Mann – Five Finger Exercise (1962)

Plot Synopsis by Mark Deming
A distinguished cast highlights this film adaptation of a stage drama by Peter Shaffer. Stanley Harrington (Jack Hawkins) is a self-made businessman incapable of expressing his emotions or compromising with others; his wife Louise (Rosalind Russell) imagines herself an intellectual, though her intelligence is more of an affectation than a reality. Stanley and Louise hire Walter (Maximilian Schell), a teacher from Germany, as a tutor for their two teenage children, effeminate Philip (Richard Beymer) and high-strung Pamela (Annette Gorman). Walter tries to ingratiate himself with the family, with little success; when he tries to get to know Louise better, she imagines that he’s fallen in love with her, and she’s deeply hurt when he confesses that he instead sees her as a motherly figure. Walter is eventually driven to the brink of suicide, which forces the family to reconsider their attitudes toward Walter and each other. Read More »

Daniel Mann – The Teahouse of the August Moon (1956)

Teahouse retains the basic appeal that made it a unique war novel and a legit hit. There is some added slapstick for those who prefer their comedy broader. Adding to its prospects are some top comedy characterizations, notably from Glenn Ford, plus the offbeat casting of Marlon Brando in a comedy role.
In transferring his play based on the Vern Sneider novel to the screen, John Patrick has provided a subtle shift in the focal interest. Read More »