Janus Metz Pedersen – Armadillo (2010)


In February 2009 a group of Danish soldiers accompanied by documentary filmmaker Janus Metz arrived at Armadillo, an army base in the southern Afghan province of Helmand. Metz and cameraman Lars Skree spent six months following the lives of young soldiers situated less than a kilometer away from Taliban positions. The outcome of their work is a gripping and highly authentic war drama that was justly awarded the Grand Prix de la Semaine de la Critique at this year’s Cannes film festival. But it also provoked furious debate in Denmark concerning the controversial behavior of certain Danish soldiers during a shootout with Taliban fighters. The filmmakers repeatedly risked their lives shooting this tense, brilliantly edited, and visually sophisticated probe into the psychology of young men in the midst of a senseless war whose victims are primarily local villagers. Yet more disturbing than scenes in which Taliban bullets whiz past their cameras is the footage of the young soldiers as each tries, in his own way, to come to terms with putting his life constantly on the line Continue reading

Dag Johan Haugerud – Det er meg du vil ha AKA I’m the One You Want (2014)


This film tells the true story of a 30-year-old female high school teacher who falls in love with a 15-year-old pupil and starts a relationship with him. Sonja Evang’s script is based on interviews with the real life persons. It was developed and shot to be screened at the Norwegian Drama Festival.

Sindre Kaspersen @ IMDB wrote:
Norwegian screenwriter and director Dag Johan Haugerud’s second narrative feature which was written by Norwegian screenwriter Sonja Evang, is inspired by real events and interviews with the person in question. It premiered at the Norwegian Drama Festival in 2013, was shot on location in Oslo, Norway and is a Norwegian production which was produced by Norwegian producer Yngve Sæther. It tells the story about a 32-year-old Norwegian female secondary school teacher who gradually fell in love with her 15-year-old pupil and how she approached and handled this situation. Continue reading

Jessica Nilsson – All About Anna (2005)


All About Anna is a Danish film released in 2005, directed by Jessica Nilsson and starring Gry Bay and Mark Stevens. The film is explicit in its exploration of sexual relationships. It avoids being classified as pornography, however, through avoidance of closeup views of genital/genital contact.
It is a co-production between Innocent Pictures and Lars von Trier’s Zentropa Productions, and is the third of Zentropa’s sex films for women, following Constance (1998) and Pink Prison (1999). All three films were based on the Puzzy Power Manifesto developed by Zentropa in 1997. Continue reading

Lars von Trier – Dogville (2003)


Late one night, a beautiful and well-dressed young woman, Grace, arrives in the mountainous old mining town of Dogville as a fugitive; following the sound of gunshots in the distance which have been heard by Tom, the self-appointed moral spokesman for the town. Persuaded by Tom, the town agree to hide Grace, and in return she freely helps the locals. However, when the Sheriff from a neighbouring town posts a Missing notice, advertising a reward for revealing her whereabouts, the townsfolk require a better deal from Grace, in return for their silence; and when the Sheriff returns some weeks later with a Wanted poster, even though the citizens know her to be innocent of the false charges against her, the town’s sense of goodness takes a sinister turn and the price of Grace’s freedom becomes a workload and treatment akin to that of a slave. But Grace has a deadly secret that the townsfolk will eventually encounter.
Written by Neil Hillman. Continue reading

Søren Kragh-Jacobsen – Mifunes sidste sang aka Mifune’s Last Song (1999)


As developed by Danish directors Lars Von Trier and Thomas Vinterberg, Dogma 95’s so-called “Vow Of Chastity” places restrictions on filmmakers—use only handheld cameras, real locations, and available light while avoiding superficial action (weapons, murders, etc.) and genre pieces—for the ostensible purpose of a truer, more organic cinema. Critics anxious to dismiss the movement were silenced by Vinterberg’s entry, Dogma 1: The Celebration, a devastating black comedy made all the more powerful by its stripped-down, home-movie-like quality. But the Dogma tenets seem arbitrary in Dogma 3: Mifune, which follows the rules but misses the point, employing cruddy naturalism to pass off a contrived and deeply conventional story. Had Von Trier and Vinterberg thought to include the hooker-with-a-heart-of-gold or estranged-autistic-brother (a la Rain Man) under “superficial action,” director Søren Kragh-Jacobsen might have improvised something less predictable. On its own modest terms, however, Mifune is still a well-performed and mildly affecting provincial drama that shares Vinterberg’s interest in family, if not his wit and innovation. Continue reading

Morten Arnfred – Måske ku’ vi aka Could We Maybe (1976)



During a bank holdup, an early teenaged boy and girl (Karl Wagner and Marianne Svendsen) are taken hostage by the robbers. After a very pleasant captivity, during which they play Monopoly with their captors, they escape into the countryside. The two consummate their first love and have a number of delightful adventures but eventually must return to their everyday lives. Continue reading

Ole Christian Madsen – Kærlighedshistorie AKA Kira’s Reason: A Love Story (2001)


En Kærlighedshistorie AKA Dogme # 21

REVIEW by Scott Tobias (from avclub.com):

The 21st film to receive official Dogme certification, and one of the few unharmed by its minimalist limitations, Ole Christian Madsen’s powerful Kira’s Reason: A Love Story could be the undercard to A Woman Under The Influence, John Cassavetes’ seminal study of a marriage and mental illness. Beginning with a wife’s return home after time in a psychiatric ward, both films gain their tension from the strained attempt to return to normalcy after everything has irrevocably changed, a transitional phase made all the more painful by brief flashes of the couple’s old dynamic. Though Madsen’s middle-class heroes have little in common with Cassavetes’ more combative blue-collar counterparts, their reunion is similarly raw, painful, and unexpectedly romantic, as they try to redefine their relationship around a new set of terms. Looking and acting uncannily like a young Genevieve Bujold, Stine Stengade gives a touchingly unhinged performance as the title character, a madwoman who tries to find her footing as a wife and mother after being committed for an unspecified condition. While she was away, her husband Lars Mikkelsen had an affair with her sister, but he seems genuinely willing to grant her every opportunity to reenter their lives. Continue reading