Richard Martini – Camera (2000)


From Imdb:
Richard Martini’s “Camera” is an ambitious – yet, addictive independent film encompassing intrigue, comedy and adventure. An inside look into the lives of several people – via the one digital camera they all buy – it’s a compulsively magnetic piece that shows flair and creativity on behalf of the helmer. It’s got no budget and it’s got no buzz – but “Camera” is a rare delight, and especially interesting to see Martini can draw in some fine cameos by people like Jack Nicholson, Oliver Stone, and Angie Everhart.
Bravo Martini – we look forward to your next project. Continue reading

Aneta Leshnikovska – Boli li? Prvata balkanska dogma aka Does it hurt? (2007)


The Dogma 95 film movement appeared out of the need to make low budget films that will be concentrated on the storytelling and the acting. No long preparations, no stylish million-dollar bullshitting. Just film. For many years most of the filmmakers in the Balkan have been doing exactly the same. It is just that they haven’t made a manifesto and most of them have never even heard of Dogma 95. Does it hurt? The First Balkan Dogma is a no budget mockumentary shot on HDV according to the dogma rules.

A Macedonian filmmaker wants to make the first official Balkan Dogma film in Macedonia. She lies to her friends that she got financial support from the Zentropa producers. The film starts from the moment that she gathers her closest friends and asks them to join her in the quest for finding the right story for the film. She has decided to film the whole process from the very beginning and use it later for the making off. Following the four characters in their quest we discover Macedonia and the Balkans in 2006. The camera captures visual sequences of the absurdity, humour and survival techniques of a land and people in transition. The making of project ultimately becomes the true subject of the film. Continue reading

Søren Kragh-Jacobsen – Mifunes sidste sang aka Mifune’s Last Song (1999)


As developed by Danish directors Lars Von Trier and Thomas Vinterberg, Dogma 95’s so-called “Vow Of Chastity” places restrictions on filmmakers—use only handheld cameras, real locations, and available light while avoiding superficial action (weapons, murders, etc.) and genre pieces—for the ostensible purpose of a truer, more organic cinema. Critics anxious to dismiss the movement were silenced by Vinterberg’s entry, Dogma 1: The Celebration, a devastating black comedy made all the more powerful by its stripped-down, home-movie-like quality. But the Dogma tenets seem arbitrary in Dogma 3: Mifune, which follows the rules but misses the point, employing cruddy naturalism to pass off a contrived and deeply conventional story. Had Von Trier and Vinterberg thought to include the hooker-with-a-heart-of-gold or estranged-autistic-brother (a la Rain Man) under “superficial action,” director Søren Kragh-Jacobsen might have improvised something less predictable. On its own modest terms, however, Mifune is still a well-performed and mildly affecting provincial drama that shares Vinterberg’s interest in family, if not his wit and innovation. Continue reading

Ole Christian Madsen – Kærlighedshistorie AKA Kira’s Reason: A Love Story (2001)


En Kærlighedshistorie AKA Dogme # 21

REVIEW by Scott Tobias (from

The 21st film to receive official Dogme certification, and one of the few unharmed by its minimalist limitations, Ole Christian Madsen’s powerful Kira’s Reason: A Love Story could be the undercard to A Woman Under The Influence, John Cassavetes’ seminal study of a marriage and mental illness. Beginning with a wife’s return home after time in a psychiatric ward, both films gain their tension from the strained attempt to return to normalcy after everything has irrevocably changed, a transitional phase made all the more painful by brief flashes of the couple’s old dynamic. Though Madsen’s middle-class heroes have little in common with Cassavetes’ more combative blue-collar counterparts, their reunion is similarly raw, painful, and unexpectedly romantic, as they try to redefine their relationship around a new set of terms. Looking and acting uncannily like a young Genevieve Bujold, Stine Stengade gives a touchingly unhinged performance as the title character, a madwoman who tries to find her footing as a wife and mother after being committed for an unspecified condition. While she was away, her husband Lars Mikkelsen had an affair with her sister, but he seems genuinely willing to grant her every opportunity to reenter their lives. Continue reading

Harmony Korine – Julien Donkey-Boy (1999)


O, mio babbino caro plays as a woman skates gracefully. In contrast, little is graceful and daddy is not dear in Julien’s world. His father listens to blues wearing a gas mask; dad prods, lectures, and derides Julien as well as Julien’s brother and pregnant sister, while grandma attends to her dog. Julien is different, schizophrenic. He wears gold teeth. He bowls, sings, worships, and chats with a group of young adults with disabilities. His sister’s child is probably his own. He talks on the phone, imagining it’s his mother, who died in childbirth years before. He may be a murderer of children. From his point of view (perhaps), the film follows this odd family for a few weeks. Continue reading

Natasha Arthy – Se til venstre, der er en Svensker AKA Old, New, Borrowed and Blue (2003)


REVIEW by Anji Milanovic (from

In Old, New, Borrowed and Blue director Natasha Arthy begins the film with a signed certificate of authenticity from the Dogma school. By the film’s end, however, it’s clear that she has taken the rules of Dogma and used them to make her own engaging film, instead of an exercise in philosophical experimentation.

Katrine (Sidse Babett Knudsen) is a few days from tying the knot to her dopey but affable fiance (Soren Byder). Her sister (Lotte Anderson) is locked up in a mental ward following a painful break up to Thomsen (Bjorn Kjellman), who abandoned her and took off to Africa. Enter Thomsen on Katrina’s doorstep and together they take off to prepare for Katrine’s wedding. Continue reading