Drama

Ulu Grosbard – Georgia (1995)

Synopsis:
Sadie is desperately looking up to her older sister Georgia who is a famous C&W artist. Sadie wants to be a famous artist like her sister, but is always doing everything wrong. Her desperate need to be accepted by her sister is constantly complicated by her drug and alcohol problems. Georgia lives a very ordered life with husband, house and children, and Sadie does everything to get her attention. Read More »

Andrzej Wajda – Wesele AKA The Wedding (1973)

Quote:
It’s 1900, and for the last 130 years Poland has been wiped off the map of Europe; it’s still occupied by three invaders: Russia, Austria and Prussia. In a village near Cracow, a wedding takes place between a poet from the city and a country girl. The intelligentsia celebrates alongside the peasantry, but this is the full extent of any “agreement” between these two social classes, and the wedding guests are made aware of it by visiting apparitions. The chance for a national uprising is duly lost. Read More »

Janusz Morgenstern – Do widzenia, do jutra aka See You Tomorrow; Good Bye, Till Tomorrow (1960)

In this routine story within a story from Poland, Jacek (Zbigniew Cybulski) is the head of a troupe of thespians and so he is responsible for getting together the material for them to act out on the stage. One day he meets Marguerite (Teresa Tuszynska), the charming and sophisticated daughter of a French diplomat, and his heart does flips. He longs to be with her but she herself is more sensible. What kind of a life would she have with an actor? His ultimate rejection leaves him ample time to mope around and be miserable. But then, Jacek the actor has to get another story ready for his troupe — and so was this sequence of love lost real — or another play for the troupe to perform?~ Eleanor Mannikka, All Movie Guide Read More »

Carl Theodor Dreyer – Vredens dag AKA Day of Wrath [+ Extras] (1943)

Plot:
In a 17th-century Danish village, an old woman is accused of witchcraft. In the shadow of her flight, capture, confession, and burning at the stake, the young wife of the town’s aging pastor falls in love with the pastor’s son. Her confession of this illicit affair to her husband brings on her husband’s death. At the funeral the pastor’s mother denounces the young widow as a witch. Will the widow’s lover come to her defense, or has the day of wrath returned? Read More »

Stanley Kubrick – Fear and Desire (1953)

Synopsis:
A ficticious war in an unidentified country provides the setting for this drama. Four soldiers survive the crash-landing of their plane to find themselves in a forest six miles behind enemy lines. The group, led by Lt. Corby, has a plan: They’ll make their way to a nearby river, build a raft, and then, under cover of night, float back to friendly territory. Their plans for getting back safely are sidetracked by a young woman who stumbles across them as they hide in the woods, and by the nearby presence of an enemy general who one member of the group is determined to kill. Read More »

Roberto Rossellini – L’Età di Cosimo de Medici AKA The Age of Medici AKA The Age of Cosimo de Medici (1972)

Synopsis:
This three-part saga evokes the social, economic, and religious life of fifteenth-century Florence through two of its leading lights: banker Cosimo de’ Medici and art theorist Leon Battista Alberti. The Age of the Medici is like a Renaissance painting come to life. The three episodes of approximately 90 minutes each, begins as a movie about the shrewd worldliness of the banker Cosimo de’ Medici and ends as a tribute to the scholarly humanism of the author and architect Leon Battista Alberti. “Medicis” leaves us with an impression of Quattrocento Florence as a city of sublime harmony in which art and commerce are in perfect balance, seamlessly interdependent. Read More »

Roberto Rossellini – Cartesius (1974)

Rossellini, 1973: One makes films in order to become a better human being.
The New York Times, : Just watching Rossellini’s magnificent work may help a bit in that department as well.

In the final phase of his career, Italian master Roberto Rossellini embarked on a dramatic, daunting project: a series of television films about knowledge and history, made in an effort to teach, where contemporary media were failing. Looking at the Western world’s major figures and moments, yet focusing on the small details of daily life, Rossellini was determined not to recount history but to relive it, as it might have been, unadorned and full of the drama of the everyday. This selection of Rossellini’s history films presents The Age of the Medici, Cartesius and Blaise Pascal – works that don’t just enliven the past but illuminate the ideas that have brought us to where we are today. Read More »