Drama

S. Sylvan Simon – The Crime of Doctor Hallet (1938)

This underrated feature stars Ralph Bellamy as Dr. Paul Hallet, working in the jungles of Sumatra with associate Jack Murray (William Gargan), experimenting on monkeys in search of a cure for red fever. Enter a much younger doctor, Phillip Saunders (John “Dusty” King), whose arrival is met with disapproval by the much older Hallet, who consigns the newcomer to a life of cleaning test tubes. Accidentally stumbling on a possible cure, Saunders tries to share his discovery with the unresponsive Hallet, then decides to conduct his own private research without the others knowledge. When Hallet arrives at his own solution, the eager Saunders inoculates himself with red fever, trusting that Hallet’s cure will save him, but it fails. Read More »

Stole Popov – Gypsy Magic AKA Gipsy Magic (1997)

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In a Macedonian gypsy village local man meets an Indian UNPROFOR physician whom he sees as solution to all his troubles. Read More »

Ann Guedes & Eduardo Guedes – Bearskin: An Urban Fairytale (1989)

Johnny Fortune is no good to anyone, not mean, but just no good. To escape Casino bosses
who want him for stealing money, he flees to England. He gets a job dressed as a bear for
Punch & Judy shows, which is an effective disguise. But when the Casino thugs track him
down it’s up to his two resourceful bosses to help him. Read More »

Bill Gunn – Personal Problems (1980)

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An “experimental soap opera” centered around a Harlem nurse, her husband, her father-in-law, and her lover.

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This entirely African American-conceived and produced ensemble drama is the result of a collaboration of a pair of pioneering Black artists: writer Ishmael Reed and filmmaker Bill Gunn, who wrote and directed the underground classic Ganja & Hess and wrote the screenplay for Hal Ashby’s The Landlord. Originally intended to air on public television in 1980, it went unseen for many years Read More »

Götz Spielmann – Revanche (2008)

Roger Ebert Review :
“Revanche” involves a rare coming together of a male’s criminal nature and a female’s deep needs, entwined with a first-rate thriller. It is also perceptive in observing characters, including a proud old man. Rare is the thriller that is more about the reasons of people instead of the needs of the plot. Read More »

Ming Zhang – Ming wang xing shi ke AKA The Pluto Moment (2018)

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Tracking an independent film crew on a difficult field research trip in Southwest China, Sixth Generation writer-director Zhang Ming’s “The Pluto Moment” ponders the relationship between life and death, nature and society, art and commercialism. Unlike many films about filmmaking, which lend themselves to a kind of meta self-awareness, this deceptively simple yet quietly revelatory drama features engaging characters and offers wryly ironic comments on the unpredictable nature of film production. Read More »

Philip Gröning – Die Frau des Polizisten AKA The Police Officer’s Wife (2013)

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The pursuit of truth is a demand that cannot be fulfilled through seeing alone. An encounter with cinema resides through a locale of turbulent openings that allow a mental space for future thought still to be developed. Our very idea of narrative enjoyment is a misnomer, a cul­-de-­sac that needn’t answer anything other than enjoyment. Yet there exists an avenue where the idea of enjoyment is something only to be savoured retrospectively; the experience of this achievement is of the moment – painful, meditative and transcendental. Philip Gröning’s The Police Officer’s Wife (2013) arrives burdened by existing on its own terms, a film experienced but not particularly enjoyed by most at Venice last year. Read More »