Drama

Riri Riza – Gie (2005)

Based on a true character, GIE is a central yet unknown political activist/writer in the 60’s, the darkest era of Indonesian history. His life is a clash between a high drama of political events, and small world of friendship and romance. He is falling apart when he sees that his constant battle for justice and truth gives labor to another dictatorial regime. As time passes the people around him adjust to the new regime, but he continues to fight. His uncompromised idealism drives people away. His friends left him; the woman he loves rejects him. Only the beauty of nature can rescue and free him. Read More »

Kon Ichikawa – Sasame-yuki AKA The Makioka Sisters (1983)

This lyrical adaptation of the beloved novel by Junichiro Tanizaki was a late-career triumph for director Kon Ichikawa. Structured around the changing of the seasons, The Makioka Sisters (Sasame-yuki) follows the lives of four siblings who have taken on their family’s kimono manufacturing business, in the years leading up to the Pacific War. The two oldest have been married for some time, but according to tradition, the rebellious youngest sister cannot wed until the third, conservative and terribly shy, finds a husband. This graceful study of a family at a turning point in history is a poignant evocation of changing times and fading customs, shot in rich, vivid colors. (~Criterion) Read More »

Olivier Assayas – Doubles vies AKA Non-Fiction (2018) (HD)

Synopsis
Set in the Parisian publishing world, an editor and an author find themselves in over their heads, as they cope with a middle-age crisis, the changing industry and their wives. Read More »

Seijun Suzuki – Kawachi Karumen AKA Carmen from Kawachi (1966)

Synopsis:
‘Carmen from Kawachi brings the nihilist Suzuki universe to a woman’s life in the decidedly unsentimental education of a provincial factory worker, Tsuyuko, whose rape by two fellow villagers starts her on the road to sexual awareness and finally, independence. It is a long, picaresque road indeed, meandering from Osaka’s Club Dada, through liaisons with a millionaire, a dominatrix, and an action painter–all the while cohabiting with a degenerate if loving roué. The determining encounter is with a corrupt monk, whose sordid affair with her mother had been for Tsuyuko a primal introduction to sexual hypocrisy and male brutality.’
– James Quandt Read More »

Ji-woo Jung – Haepi-endeu AKA Happy End (1999)

Quote:
Bo ra, a successful English institute manager, has became the financial pillar of the house since her seemingly much older husband, Min ki, once a successful banker has lost his job. Her boring, stressing, without passion,…. life has driven her to her former lover, Il bom. This movie is story of a hell that she has made for herself and her two men and their not so happy ending. Read More »

Luis Buñuel – Le journal d’une femme de chambre AKA Diary of a Chambermaid (1964)

Quote:
This wicked adaptation of the Octave Mirbeau novel is classic Luis Buñuel. Jeanne Moreau is Celestine, a beautiful Parisian domestic who, upon arrival at her new job at an estate in provincial 1930s France, entrenches herself in sexual hypocrisy and scandal with her philandering employer (Buñuel regular Michel Piccoli). Filmed in luxurious black-and-white Franscope, Diary of a Chambermaid is a raw-edged tangle of fetishism and murder—and a scathing look at the burgeoning French fascism of the era. Read More »

Fatih Akin – Aus dem Nichts AKA In the Fade (2017)

Quote:

First off: Fatih Akin’s “The Cut” was an aberration, as we all suspected. The director celebrated for his edgy takes on intriguing characters more or less returns with “In the Fade,” a well-constructed, at times moving story of a Hamburg woman seeking justice after the murder of her Kurdish husband and son by a couple of Neo-Nazis. “More or less” because the excellent first quarter gives way to a relatively standard-issue though handsomely produced legal drama with several stock characters and a script that feels too guided by the presumed requirements of mainstream cinema. Diane Kruger’s powerhouse performance in her first German-language production goes a long way toward compensating for the narrative’s dip into overly crystalline waters, and international sales have been unsurprisingly brisk given the film’s incontrovertible general appeal. Read More »