Drama

Mervyn LeRoy – Gentleman’s Fate (1931)

Synopsis:
Pre-code melodrama starring John Gilbert as Jack Thomas, rich, penthouse-dwelling playboy with a brand new fiancee named Marjorie (Leila Hyams) and his own English “gentleman’s gentleman” (just given orders to burn his gallery of photos and phone numbers). Called to meet his guardian “Papa Mario”, Jack is informed he has a brother named Frank and a father who has been shot and is calling for his long-lost son from his deathbed. This is all news to Jack who didn’t know about this family at all (he thought he was an orphan). Read More »

John Glenister & Robin Phillips – Miss Julie (1972)

IMDB:
A televised Royal Shakespeare Company production of August Strindberg’s classic play. Miss Julie (Helen Mirren), a 19th century aristocrat’s daughter, is attracted to one of the servants in her father’s house. Read More »

Jean Renoir – Toni (1935)

Masters of Cinema wrote:
Financed by Marcel Pagnol’s production company, Jean Renoir’s Toni is a landmark in French filmmaking. Based on a police dossier concerning a provincial crime of passion, it was lensed by Claude Renoir on location (unusually for the time) in the small town of Les Martigues where the actual events occurred. The use of directly-recorded sound, authentic patois, lack of make-up, a large ensemble cast of local citizens in supporting roles, and Renoir’s steadfast desire to avoid melodrama lead to Toni often being labeled “the first ‘neorealist’ film”. Renoir himself disagreed. Although Toni is acknowledged as a masterly forerunner of neo-realist preoccupations and techniques he wrote: “I do not think that is quite correct. The Italian films are magnificent dramatic productions, whereas in Toni I was at pains to avoid the dramatic.” Read More »

Elmer Clifton & Ida Lupino – Not Wanted (1949)

After a beautiful but unsophisticated girl is seduced by a worldly piano player and gives up her out-of-wedlock baby, her guilt compels her to kidnap another child. Read More »

Kris Niklison – Vergel (2017)

Quote:
An unashamedly erotic look at female queer sexuality viewed through the prism of emotional trauma, Vergel is guaranteed to stir. A sudden mourning brings a woman to the edge of madness. Funeral procedures, heat and a neighbor that comes to water the plants, come together in an emotional journey where it is impossible to distinguish the real from the unreal. Read More »

John Gilling – The Quiet Woman (1951)

Quote:
Having previously been married to a criminal, Jane Foster (Jane Hylton) takes over a coastal pub named ‘The Quiet Woman’ to start a new life with the help of her loyal and protective employee Elsie (Dora Bryan). She is indignant to discover that the previous owner had allowed an amiable local artist and part-time smuggler Duncan McLeod (Derek Bond) to use the pub for storing contraband goods but despite this, a romantic attachment develops between them. Helen (Dianne Foster), an old flame of McLeods, tricks her way into staying at the pub to pose for him but becomes jealous of Jane and taunts her about knowing her past and threatens to expose her. Pressure then mounts on McLeod when an old Naval colleague Inspector Bromley (John Horsley) arrives at the pub to stay for several weeks. He now is working as a customs officer. And then Jane’s escaped convict husband turns up and demands her help. Read More »

Howard Hawks – Sergeant York (1941)

Synopsis:
Somewhat fictionalized account of the life and war service of Alvin York, who went from humble beginnings to being one of the most celebrated American servicemen to fight in World War I. As depicted in the film, Alvin turned to religion when he was struck by lightning during one of his drunken outings. Alvin took his newfound religion seriously claiming to be a conscientious objector when receiving his draft notice. When that was refused, he joined the infantry where he served with valor, capturing a large number of Germans and saving the lives of many of his men who were under heavy fire. Read More »