Koji Wakamatsu – Okasareta hakui aka Violated Angels (1967)

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A voyeur, invited into a dormitory for nurses, remains behind to violate and murder close to a dozen of them. Some of the nurses attempt to talk him out of ending their lives and much of the film is comprised of these conversations, but the talk doesn’t do much good. Most of the film is black and white and quite murky, but there are selected snippets of color to illustrate the aftermath of the killer’s work. Bleak and slow moving, Wakamatsu attempts to provide a political subtext for the nastiness, but it comes across as pretentious. The stabbings, rapes and beatings are shot mostly at a distance, but the tone is upsetting and the constant screaming and general air of misery is palpable. The score, by Wakamatsu, is hypnotic. Continue reading

Nagisa Oshima – Ai no corrida aka In the Realm of the Senses [+Extras] (1976)

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Based upon a true incident in 1930s Japan, Nagisa Oshima’s controversial film effectively skirts the borderline between pornography and art — making Bernardo Bertolucci’s Last Tango in Paris of four years earlier look like children’s programming in comparison. The story concerns servant and former prostitute Sada Abe (Eiko Matsuda) who becomes sexually obsessed with her employer Kizicho (Tatsuya Fuji), a businessman, after seeing him making love to his wife. After making love to Sada, Kizicho becomes obsessed with her as well. As their love-making becomes more and more intense, they find themselves unable to separate themselves from each other, until every waking hour is spent in more and more dangerous sexual acts with Sada becoming more and more of the aggressor. Finally, for the ultimate in eroticism, Kizicho agrees to be strangled during sexual ecstasy for the ultimate in orgasmic fulfillment. Continue reading

Tinto Brass – Action (1980)

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Description: Bruno is an idealistic hero who questions the meaning of life in this confusing and sometimes hallucinatory erotic drama. After a night in jail, he is gang-raped by punk rockers in a garbage dump. He later saves an old man who believes he is Garibaldi and a woman he believes is Ophelia. Bruno watches helplessly as she later jumps from a window.
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Luigi Scattini – Il corpo (1974)

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Plot :

Director Luigi Scattini had previously worked with the beautiful model-turned-actress Zeudi Araya in “The Sinner” (1972) and in a previous film that I have not had the pleasure of viewing. Even though she was constantly typecast as the beautiful barefoot island girl, it was always obvious that Araya was having a good time. Casting “Il Corpo” with such tried-and true talents as Leonard Mann, Enrico Maria Salerno, Carroll Baker and Ms. Araya, it is equally obvious that Scattini had a good time, and the result is a dramatic, slightly erotic thriller that begs to be seen. The story is simple and familiar: Mann comes to work for Salerno and his common-law wife Araya, and with Salerno going away from time to time, Mann and Araya fall for each other, and the classic love triangle develops. From here, though, Scattini takes his characters in not-so-obvious directions and leads them them all down the path toward self-destruction. Continue reading

Christian Marquand – Candy (1968)

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Candy is a 1968 sex farce film directed by Christian Marquand based on the 1958 novel by Terry Southern and Mason Hoffenberg, from a screenplay by Buck Henry. The film satirizes pornographic stories through the adventures of its naive heroine, Candy, played by Ewa Aulin. It stars Marlon Brando, Ewa Aulin, Ringo Starr, John Huston and Enrico Maria Salerno. Popular figures such as Sugar Ray Robinson, Anita Pallenberg, and Florinda Bolkan appear in cameo roles. Continue reading

Arthur J. Bressan Jr. – Forbidden Letters (1976)

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Synopsis: Erotic, explicit letters between a young man and his incarcerated lover recall happier (and hotter) times. The story of 2 lovers, one in jail (Richard Locke), the other, younger one (Robert Adams), still living in the San Francisco apartment they shared. A series of letters and remembrances to and of each other, but primarily from the point of view of the younger Robert who’s anxiously awaiting the release of Richard, and they’re reunion.

Parts of the movie were actually filmed in Alcatraz. The film begins in black-and-white and later changes to color. Overall, the film is very experimental and concludes in a very unconventional fashion with director Bressan narrating the credits juxtaposed with behind-the-scenes footage of the making of the film, including the cutting and editing of the film reels! Aside from the exception of Wakefield Poole’s Bijou, Forbidden Letters is probably the most artful and idiosyncratic American gay hardcore flick ever made. Continue reading