France

Marcel Hanoun – L’authentique procès de Carl-Emmanuel Jung (1966)

“It’s virtually impossible to think of a major contemporary French filmmaker who has been more independent, hence more consistently marginalized, than Marcel Hanoun (1929–2012). Born in Tunis, he immigrated to France immediately after the war and, as Bernard Benoliel and Nicole Brenez put it, “gradually taught himself the techniques of cinema, without the help of any formal schooling and apprenticeship.” Despite the fact that he remained on the margins of “the French cinema” as we know it (in terms of state support, distribution, and critical attention), he managed to make an astonishing 70 films over the course of his career. Read More »

Marcel Hanoun – Octobre à Madrid (1967

“OCTOBRE A MADRID” 1964, 70 min, 16 mm

Octobre à Madrid, de Marcel Hanoun (1964), est certainement le film qui m’a le plus hanté et nourri depuis près de quarante ans. Je l’ai vu, pour la première fois, un matin de l’année 1946 au cinéma Quartier Latin. Ces séances pour lève-tôt étaient destinées à faire connaitre des films “difficiles” ou fragiles. J’y avais également découvert, dans ce même cadre, Méditerranée de Jean-Daniel Pollet. Read More »

Claudine Nougaret – Paul Lacombe (1986)

In 1986 Paul Lacombe live out one’s remaining days in Sainte-Eulalie-de-Cernon, Aveyron. During 3 last years he wrote his memoirs. Claudine Nougaret films the meeting with her grandfather. Read More »

Fyodor Otsep – Mirages de Paris (1933)

A jolly French film, with a rich vein of satire, is at the little Acme Theatre on Union Square under the name of “Mirages de Paris.”

In this fast-moving fantasy of the unsophisticated student (Mlle. Francell) who escapes from a boarding school to become, after many trials and tribulations, the “toast of Paris,” Fedor Ozep has managed to combine much of the technic of his native Russia with the flair for the ridiculous supposed to belong to all true Parisians. Read More »

Julien Duvivier – Panique AKA Panic [2018 Restoration + Extras] (1946)

Criterion wrote:
Proud, eccentric, and antisocial, Monsieur Hire (Michel Simon) has always kept to himself. But after a woman turns up dead in the Paris suburb where he lives, he feels drawn to a pretty young newcomer to town (Viviane Romance), discovers that his neighbors are only too ready to suspect the worst of him, and is framed for the murder. Based on a novel by Georges Simenon, Julien Duvivier’s first film after his return to France from Hollywood finds the acclaimed poetic realist applying his consummate craft to darker, moodier ends. Propelled by its two deeply nuanced lead performances, the tensely noirish Panique exposes the dangers of the knives-out mob mentality, delivering as well a pointed allegory for the behavior of Duvivier’s countrymen during the war. Read More »

Julien Duvivier – Le Petit monde de Don Camillo aka The Little World of Don Camillo (1952)

Plot summary :
In a village of the Po valley where the earth is hard and life miserly, the priest and the communist mayor are always fighting to be the head of the community. If in secret, they admired and liked each other, politics still divided them as it is dividing the country. And when the mayor wants his “People’s House”; the priest wants his “Garden City” for the poor. Division exist between the richest and the poorest, the pious and the atheists and even between lovers. But if the people are hard as the country, they are good in the bottom of there heart. Read More »

Jean Grémillon – L’amour d’une femme AKA The Love of a Woman (1953)

Quote:
Marie Prieur, a young doctor, decides to settle down on Ushant, a remote island belonging to Brittany. Little by little she manages to be accepted by the population. One day she meets André Lorenzi, a handsome engineer, and it is love at first sight. Life is wonderful for a while but André wants to marry her only if she remains at home. Despite her strong feelings for André, Marie refuses to give up her vocation and the two lovers part. Marie finds herself alone, with a broken heart. Read More »