France

Constantin Brancusi – Brancusi Filmed (1923-1939)

In the early 1920’s, Man Ray, who had previously taught Constantin Brancusi how to handle a still camera, introduced him to the movie camera. These fifty minutes of film, shot between 1923 and 1939, representing the sum total of all the images ever filmed by Brancusi, have never been shown before. Read More »

Jacques Becker – Goupi mains rouges aka It happened at the inn (1943)

Quote:
Originally Goupi Mains Rouges, this was the first new French feature film to be shown in the US since the end of WW2-though “new” was a relative term, inasmuch as the film was completed in 1943. The scene is a remote, rustic inn, managed by a scruffy family of peasants known as the Goupis. Practicing their own special brand of larceny, the Goupis fancy themselves as Runyonesque rogues, going so far as to bestow colorful nicknames upon themselves. The official head of the band is “Red Hands”, played by Fernand Ledoux, but even he is answerable to the Goupis’ patriarch, a 106-year-old named “The Emperor” (Maurice Schulz). Read More »

Paul Grivas – Film catastrophe (2018)

In 2010, Godard’s Film Socialisme explores the sinking of political ideals in Europe. In 2012, the Costa Concordia, which had served as an allegorical platform for Godard, sank in front of the cameras of passengers and the world. In 2018, Paul Grivas Film Catastrophe, looks at images of the disaster to revisit the film factory Read More »

Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville – L’Enfance de l’Art (1993)

A woman, a child, a man and another child, the noise of bombs falling and of planes passing by, in a urban landscape destroyed by war.
A man dies before he had time to write on the back of La liberté guidant le peuple de Delacroix: that could be the plot, just the enigma consisting of a missing word. A question opened before death, resolved by a child, the shadow and spirit of Gavroche. Read More »

Jean-Jacques Annaud – La victoire en chantant AKA Noirs et blancs en couleur AKA Black and White in Color [+extras] (1976)

Synopsis:
French colonists in Africa, several months behind in the news, find themselves at war with their German neighbors. Deciding that they must do their proper duty and fight the Germans, they promptly conscript the local native population. Issuing them boots and rifles, the French attempt to make “proper” soldiers out of the Africans. A young, idealistic French geographer seems to be the only rational person in the town, and he takes over control of the “war” after several bungles on the part of the others. (IMDb) Read More »

Philippe Pollet-Villard – Le Mozart des pickpockets AKA The Mozart of Pickpockets (2006)

IMDB Plot summary :
Richard and Philippe live hand to mouth, backing up a gang of Spanish pickpockets on the streets of Paris, posing as policemen who arrest a gang member while the others rifle the pockets and purses of gawkers. When all of the gang except Richard and Philippe are pinched, things look grim. Plus, Richard insists that they take in a wide-eyed immigrant lad, a deaf-mute left behind in the arrests. Philippe suggests a three-person pickpocket trick, using the boy, but when that goes spectacularly badly, they hit rock bottom. Then, at the cinema, the lad finds a solution. It’s time to celebrate. Read More »

Marcel Hanoun – L’authentique procès de Carl-Emmanuel Jung (1966)

“It’s virtually impossible to think of a major contemporary French filmmaker who has been more independent, hence more consistently marginalized, than Marcel Hanoun (1929–2012). Born in Tunis, he immigrated to France immediately after the war and, as Bernard Benoliel and Nicole Brenez put it, “gradually taught himself the techniques of cinema, without the help of any formal schooling and apprenticeship.” Despite the fact that he remained on the margins of “the French cinema” as we know it (in terms of state support, distribution, and critical attention), he managed to make an astonishing 70 films over the course of his career. Read More »