France

Dennis Cooper & Zac Farley – Permanent Green Light (2018)

Roman wants to explode. Unlike other teenagers, he doesn’t seem interested in sports or drugs, girls or boys. He’s neither nihilist, religious, depressive or suicidal. His goal is to vanish, dying is unimportant and he’s only interested in the act’s spectacular effect. But please, don’t misinterpret it as a death. Read More »

Claude Pinoteau – Le silencieux AKA Escape to Nowhere (1973)

Shortly after a delegation of Russian nuclear physicists arrives in London, one of their number, a man named Haliakov, is abducted by the British security services. Haliakov is in truth Clément Tibère, a French scientist who was coerced into working for the Russians some years ago. The British agents compel Tibère to work for them, revealing the identity of two notorious spies. Tibère realises that his life is now in peril, that it is only a matter of time before the KGB takes its revenge… Read More »

Alain Delon & Robin Davis – Le battant AKA The Fighter AKA Ice (1983)

Synopsis:
Jacques Darnay (Delon) is released after having served ten years in prison for robbing a jewelry store. Much about that crime remained a mystery: the stolen diamonds were never recovered, and no one knows exactly how Charby the jeweler died. At his trial it was declared that Darnay acted alone, yet the size and complexity of the heist make that seem highly unlikely. Darnay’s release is anxiously awaited, by both the police, who hope he’ll reveal more information about the crime, and by some of Darnay’s former friends, who have a few ideas as to what might have happened to the diamonds. Having, perhaps, played in his years enough of both, Delon is the perfect point man in this duel between cops and crooks, capitalizing on each side’s strengths and weaknesses while decidedly pursuing his own agenda. Read More »

Maria Silvia Bazzoli & Christian Lelong – Moustapha Alassane, cinéaste du possible AKA Moustapha Alassane’s Cinema of Possibilities (2009)

Moustapha Alassane is a living legend in African cinema. His adventures take us to the era of “pre-cinema”, to the times of magical lantern and Chinese shadows. He is the first director of Nigerien cinema and animation films in Africa. He tells very old stories with current technology, but he also narrates the most current events with the most archaic means. This documentary not only tells the adventure of a human being and an extraordinary professional, but the memories of a generation, the history of a country, Niger in its golden age of cinema. Read More »

Edouard Molinaro – L’homme presse AKA The Hurried Man [+Extras] (1977)

Synopsis:
“A forty-something antiques dealer, Pierre Noix is a busy man, in just about every aspect of his life. Having bought a large house in Provence built on the remains of a Roman structure, he wastes no time digging around for some long lost treasure. Pierre’s plans are threatened, first by the town’s mayor, who is about to authorise the construction of a motel in the area, and then by Edwige, the daughter of the previous owner of the estate. When Edwige queries the legitimacy of the sale, Noix responds by seducing and marrying her, all in record time. Unfortunately, his troubles are far from over…”
– Films de France Read More »

Jean-Stéphane Sauvaire – Punk (2012) (DVD)

Variety review :
“Is Gallic helmer Jean-Stephane Sauvaire hooked on violence? Almost everyone appearing in his documentary “Carlitos Medellin” was dead by the time it was edited, while his fictional “Johnny Mad Dog” headlined a murderous child soldier. Next to these earlier offerings, the violence in “Punk” seems relatively mild, though the rage and frustration fueling its teenage protagonist fairly explode off the screen. Released in France as a TV movie under another title, this vibrant evocation of the contemporary European punk scene impresses, but looks oddly, unavowedly time-warped, as if unfolding in punk’s ’70s/’80s heyday, considerably lessening distrib possibilities. Read More »

Sylvain George – L’impossible – Pages Arrachées (Songs from the protests) (2009)

Situated in the vein of Rimbaud, Lautréamont, Dostoievski and Benjamin and of free jazz and punk, this film bears witness to the iniquitous policies that shape our era, the “infernal” nature of certain political lives or black bodies (those of immigrants, emigrants, workers, the unemployed, students…). It operates, as a minority film, in a critical stasis of mythical and mainstream realities, and deals with the issue of revolt and insurrection: excesses, disidentification, unclear reconfiguration… We are presented, through a dialectical reversal, “non-places” that cannot be assimilated, utopias, corps-impossibles. Read More »