Heiner Carow – Die Legende von Paul und Paula AKA The Legend of Paul and Paula (1973)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Quote:

Die Legende von Paul und Paula (English: The Legend of Paul and Paula) is a 1973 tragicomic East German film directed by Heiner Carow. It was based on the novel of the same name by Ulrich Plenzdorf.

The film was extremely popular on release and drew as many as three million viewers (the GDR had a population at the time of around 17 million). However, due to the film’s political overtones it was almost not released; East German leader Erich Honecker personally decided to allow it to be shown. Today it is considered one of the best-known East German films. Continue reading

Carl Boese & Paul Wegener – Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam aka The Golem: How He Came Into the World [+Extras] (1920)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Classic Horror Review :

Emanating from Jewish folklore, the legend of the “golem” has transfixed audiences for centuries. Although when used pejoratively the word “golem” describes a moronic person easily manipulated, the word often refers to any mythical creature animated from inanimate materials such as clay, sand, or stone.

One of the most popular “golems” appears in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Spelled “Gollum,” Tolkien’s character shares similarities with creatures that haunted Jewish legends, particularly the golem featured in director Paul Wegener’s 1920 silent classic, The Golem. Both suffer from split personalities and possess hybrid traits: Gollum is part human, part frog, fish, etc.; many Jewish golems, including Wegener’s, are monsters made of inanimate objects that carry human traits. Both have been damned or punished, and in both instances, the creatures start well intentioned but transform into evil beings, usually due to gluttony, greed, wrath, envy, or pride. Thus, they are morally “gray,” and like Wegener’s monster, Tolkien’s has often been depicted as gray in color to symbolize this amorality, most notably in Peter Jackson’s recent films. Continue reading

Helmut Weiss – Die Feuerzangenbowle (1944)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c0/Feuerzangenbowle-movie.jpg

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Die Feuerzangenbowle (The Fire-Tongs Bowl or The Punch Bowl) is a 1944 movie, directed by Helmut Weiss and is based on the book of the same name. It follows the book closely as author Spoerl also wrote the script for the movie. Both tell the story of a famous writer going undercover as a pupil at a small town secondary school after his friends tell him that he missed out on the best part of growing up by being educated at home. The story in the book takes place during the Weimar Republic in Germany. The movie was produced and released in Germany during the last years of World War II and has been called a “masterpiece of timeless, cheerful escapism.”[1] The movie stars Heinz Rühmann in the role of the student Hans Pfeiffer, which is remarkable as Rühmann was already 42 years old at that time.

From wikipedia Continue reading

Georg Tressler – Sukkubus – den Teufel im Leib (1989)

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

STORY:

A Swiss legend tells of three shepherds and their privations, “weiberlosen” time in the mountains. And as her wicked doings will be severely punished – by a bare Wurzelhexe …
REVIEW:

A former classmate, let’s call him Fred, looks at the happy Sepp Forcher – with sound turned off. Namely Fred loves the beauty of the local mountains. But not the accompanying volksdümmliche Gedudel.

Succubus – the devil in him would also be a film for Fred. For the beauty of the Alpine mountains is captured very atmospheric. And instead of folk music here sounds very consistent, Spaghetti Western-inspired score.

Succubus – THE DEVIL IN THE BODY is also a film for fans of the lower instincts. Von wegen “on pastures, there’s no sin”: One of our Senner is a nasty Saubartl who had pushed for dinner hand in his pants and lunged after the crisp boys in bed next to him.

Just a boy has no interest in the said strong men gripping hands, but he longs for the warm, wet tongue, his favorite. Which he then “herumkriegt. How he hires, the It beggars … Continue reading

Jürgen Reble – Passion (1990)

http://img718.imageshack.us/img718/6080/reblepassionavi00015268.jpg

Quote:
“PASSION is a personal film-journey in which Reble accompanies his unborn child through a ritual, following the seasons until his birth. Reble’s unfamiliar chemistry generates slowly pulsating structures and colors. Micro- and macroscopic imagery build a near-abstract, hypnotic landscape — an intimate perception of creation..”
Jurgen Reble, former member of the German filmmaking group “Schmelzdahin” (dissolved in 1989), focuses on exploring the film material through bacterial processes, weathering and chemical treatment during and after development.
“The basic idea is that it is impossible to fix film. Film is something which is always in a state of flux… The images, “real” in the beginning, gradually disintegrate and the gelatine layer — where the chemicals are embedded — dissolves. All that’s left in the end is the ‘raging of the elements’..” Continue reading

Gerhard Benedikt Friedl – Hat Wolff von Amerongen Konkursdelikte begangen? aka Did Wolff von Amerongen Commit Bankruptcy Offenses? (2004)

http://img638.imageshack.us/img638/7133/yzkjg00z.jpg

29f7c043f76a2bde437fd0d52a185152

Quote:
The most remarkable discovery in recent German-language cinema: Gerhard Friedl’s first feature is a hypnotic visual puzzle at the interface of documentary, essay film and pulp fiction. On the soundtrack: an unflinchingly ‘objective’ account of the labyrinthine genealogies, criminal involvements and afflictions of Germany’s economic leaders in the 20th century. On the screen: pans and tracking shots through European financial centres, production sites and landscapes. The sheer depth and crispness of these images is a treat in itself; a transformation into cinégénie of what artists like Candida Höfer or Jeff Wall have done by means of still photography. At times, image and sound are aligned, at others they just miss each other. They invariably suggest correlations. Paranoia? Irony? Can the prosaic, criminal state of affairs of a modern economy be depicted at all? Pierre Rissient, the French film historian, puts the film where it belongs: “Fritz Lang would have loved it!” Continue reading

Ingo Niermann & Erick Niedling – The Future of Art (2011)

http://img846.imageshack.us/img846/8826/vlcsnap2012030522h24m01.png

A film that came with a book in the same name, The Future of Art; A manual.
The film contains documentary and interviews on acclaimed artists about the direction of art towards the future.

with:

Marina Abramovic
Thomas Bayrle
Olaf Breuning
Genesis and lady Jaye Breyer P-Orridge
Olafur Elaisson
Harald Falckenberg
Boris Groys
Damien Hirst
Gregor Jansen
Terence Koh
Gabriel Von Loebell
Marcos Lutyens
Philomene Magers
Antje Majewski
Hans Ulrich Obrist
Thomas Olbricht
Friedrich Petzel
Tobias Rehberger
Hans Georg Wagner
Continue reading