Gregg Araki – Three Bewildered People in the Night (1987)

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AllMovie Plot Synopsis by Hal Erickson
The titular trio in Three Bewildered People in the Night is played by Darcy Marta, Mark Howell and John Lacques. Experimental filmmaker Gregg Araki follows the threesome — aspiring artists all — as they wander through the apartments, galleries and coffee shops of Greenwich Village. Their lives are complicated by their carnal urges, both homosexual and otherwise. A multiple award winner at the 1988 Locarno Film Festival, Three Bewildered People never receives widespread distribution. Continue reading

Gregg Araki – Mysterious Skin (2004)

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Description: Mysterious Skin is a 2004 film concerning the effect of childhood sexual abuse on two boys from Hutchinson, Kansas. The film received extensive critical acclaim. The film is California filmmaker Gregg Araki’s eighth, debuting at the Venice Film Festival in 2004 although it was not more widely distributed until 2005. It is based on the 1996 novel of the same name by Scott Heim. Continue reading

Gregg Araki – Totally F***ed Up (1993)

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from all movie:
A group of gay and lesbian teen characters addresses the camera directly in this pseudo-documentary about the travails of queer adolescence in early-’90s Los Angeles. Andy (James Duval), who hides his sensitive side beneath a nihilistic exterior, really yearns to find a nice boyfriend and settle down the way his pal Steven (Gilbert Luna), an aspiring filmmaker, has with boyfriend Deric (Lance May). Meanwhile, their sex-crazed friend Tommy (Roko Belic) has been kicked out by his parents for being homosexual. The only seemingly carefree members of this adoptive family are Michele (Susan Behshid) and Patricia (Jenee Gill), a lesbian couple whose desire to raise a child together leads the boys to participate in a group sperm donation during one of the film’s many scenes of these characters just hanging out and rapping about AIDS, fag-bashing, homophobia, and alienation. In-between polemicizing and posing in front of Steven’s camera for interviews, Andy meets college student Ian (Alan Boyce), who seems, at least for a while, to be Mr. Right. Just as Andy and Ian’s relationship begins to blossom, Steven and Deric’s starts to fall apart, but nothing’s for certain in director Gregg Araki’s angst-ridden world. Framed as 15 vignettes, each one introduced by an ironic intertitle and many of them interspersed with graphic sexual and commercial images, Totally F***ed Up marked the end of Araki’s no-budget phase; the glossy, gaudy Doom Generation would follow two years later. Continue reading

Gregg Araki – Nowhere (1997)

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Quote:
“Described by director Gregg Araki as “A Beverly Hills 90210 episode on acid” (with no suggestions of what it might be cut with), Nowhere is a companion piece with Araki’s previous meditations on youth gone wild in the 1990s, Totally F***ed Up and The Doom Generation — Araki’s self-described “teen apocalypse trilogy.” Nowhere follows 18-year-old Dark Smith (James Duval) as he goes through a fairly typical day in Los Angeles. Dark needs, but rarely gets, emotional support from his girlfriend Mel (Rachel True). Mel, however, is also involved with a girl named Lucifer (Kathleen Robertson), while Dark moons over hunky Montgomery (Nathan Bexton). Dark’s best friend Cowboy (Guillermo Diaz) has troubles of his own, as his boyfriend and bandmate Bart (Jeremy Jordan) is back on drugs and spending most of his time with his dealer. Mel’s friends include sugar junkie Dingbat (Christina Applegate), doomsday poetess Alyssa (Jordan Ladd), and Egg (Sarah Lassez), who is being unexpectedly wooed by a Famous Teen Idol (Jason Simmons). Egg’s brother Ducky (Scott Caan) has a crush on Alyssa, but she’s keeping company with a biker named Elvis (Thyme Lewis). Alyssa’s assignation with Elvis gets a psychic boost by her twin brother Shad (Ryan Phillippe) and his tryst with Lilith (Heather Graham). Continue reading