Horror

Dan O’Bannon – The Resurrected (1991)

Since the beginning of time, man has struggled with death. Now Charles Dexter Ward, a wealthy scientist, may have found a way to beat it. Using an ancient diary and human remains, Ward begins a terrifying and bloody pursuit for immortality. By the time his wife Claire hires private investigator John March to halt the horrible experiments, it’s too late … the dead have been resurrected! Read More »

Ivan Reitman – Cannibal Girls (1973)

Newlyweds Clifford (Eugene Levy, AMERICAN PIE) and Gloria (Andrea Martin, BLACK CHRISTMAS and its remake) go way off the beaten path for a honeymoon in the snowy Canadian town of Farmhaven. The innkeeper Mrs. Wainwright (May Jarvis) tells them of the legend of the Cannibal Girls who lured men to their isolated farmhouse to kill and eat; then, of course, she recommends that they sample the local cuisine at a gourmet restaurant now residing in the same old farmhouse. The restaurant is run by the top-hatted and cloaked Reverend Alex St. John (Ronald Ulrich) and is staffed by three beautiful women (Randall Carpenter, Bonnie Neilson, and Mira Pawluk) and a hunchbacked henchman (Bunker). Read More »

Carlos Aured – El espanto surge de la tumba AKA Horror Rises from the Tomb (1973)

Synopsis:
In Medieval France a warlock is be-headed and his wife tortured and executed. Hundreds of years later an isolated group of people discover his head buried on their property. Soon it comes back to life, possessing people and using them to commit sacrifices and to search for the rest of his body. Read More »

Eddie Romero – The Twilight People (1972)

Synopsis:
A scientist kidnaps a man and transports him to an island, intent on turning him into a super-being. The man obviously doesn’t like this idea, so he tries to escape with the help of the scientist’s daughter and a band of half-human, half-animal creatures. Read More »

Dan Curtis – The Night Strangler AKA Kolchak: The Night Strangler (1973)

Synopsis:
The Night Strangler is the sequel to the enormously successful 1972 TV movie The Night Stalker. Darren McGavin returns as seedy reporter Carl Kolchak, who previously ran into conflict when Las Vegas authorities refused to acknowledge Kolchak’s uncovering of a modern-day vampire. Now he’s in Seattle, on the trail of a mysterious strangler who drains the blood of his victims. Kolchak’s quest takes him to a hidden underground city beneath Seattle and the bizarre residents therein. Margaret Hamilton (The Wizard of Oz) is seen briefly as an expert on alchemy; John Carradine also makes cameo. The success of this telemovie and its predecessor inspired a brief 1974 TV series, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, also starring McGavin.

— Hal Erickson. Read More »

Leopoldo Savona – Byleth – il demone dell’incesto aka Byleth the Demon of Incest (1972)

Synopsis:
The Duke Lionello Shandwell is delighted that his sister Barbara has returned home, after being away for a year in Venice, to his lonely ancestral castle in the Roman countryside. His happiness is disrupted when she reveals that she has since gotten married to Giordano. Although he doesn’t fully show it around others, Lionello is deeply disturbed by his sister’s new union, and it’s not in a protective big brother sort of way. While his sister and brother-in-law stay with him, Lionello sometimes retreats into a tormented, depraved, and jealous state, spying on them making love, harboring repressed aggression towards Giordano. Barbara is a red head, and meanwhile a giallo-esque killer is going around killing red heads. Could it be Lionello venting his aggressions over his unrequited love for Barbara, or is it something more demonic? Read More »

Lars von Trier – Epidemic (1987)

Epidemic (1987)

Epidemic arose from a challenge between Lars von Trier and Claes Kastholm of the Danish Film Institute, Trier betting – in order to get funding for another film – that he could make a film for less than one million Danish Kroner (about £100,000). The result is an intriguing film, but not a very good one, showing at least what Trier could do under self-imposed limitations, paving the way for The Kingdom and showing roots that would lead to the Dogme Manifesto. Read More »