Herschell Gordon Lewis – Color Me Blood Red (1965)

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SUMMARY
An eccentric artist is panned by a well-known critic at his opening for not having a good color sense, so he starts a new series, using his own blood to paint. Soon he is weakened and must find other sources of blood to continue his paintings.
Ed Sutton on IMDb Continue reading Herschell Gordon Lewis – Color Me Blood Red (1965)

Chano Urueta – Demonio azul (1965)

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Quote:
Very hard to find movie featuring Blue Demon in his first starring role. The story involves the hero teaming up with a professor to challenge a mad scientist who turns himself into a werewolf.

Like the other early films Blue Demon made for producer Enrique Vergara (El Poder Satánico, Arañas infernales & La Sombra del Murciélago), El Demonio Azul was cheaply made but quite effective and has a creepier atmosphere than similar horror/lucha movies starring El Santo. Continue reading Chano Urueta – Demonio azul (1965)

Giorgio Ferroni – La Notte dei diavoli AKA Night of the Devils (1972)

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Synopsis:

The film begins with an unknown man stumbling into hospital. He doesn’t make any attempt to identify himself, but soon after an unknown woman turns up and he begins to panic. From there we go back in time as the man remembers the events that lead up to him stumbling into the hospital. It emerges that he had a break down and was forced to stay with a family out in the woods. They are clearly hiding something right from the start and we soon find out that there’s a witch in the woods who has taken their father.
– The_Void (IMDb)
Continue reading Giorgio Ferroni – La Notte dei diavoli AKA Night of the Devils (1972)

Carl Boese & Paul Wegener – Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam aka The Golem: How He Came Into the World [+Extras] (1920)

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Classic Horror Review :

Emanating from Jewish folklore, the legend of the “golem” has transfixed audiences for centuries. Although when used pejoratively the word “golem” describes a moronic person easily manipulated, the word often refers to any mythical creature animated from inanimate materials such as clay, sand, or stone.

One of the most popular “golems” appears in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Spelled “Gollum,” Tolkien’s character shares similarities with creatures that haunted Jewish legends, particularly the golem featured in director Paul Wegener’s 1920 silent classic, The Golem. Both suffer from split personalities and possess hybrid traits: Gollum is part human, part frog, fish, etc.; many Jewish golems, including Wegener’s, are monsters made of inanimate objects that carry human traits. Both have been damned or punished, and in both instances, the creatures start well intentioned but transform into evil beings, usually due to gluttony, greed, wrath, envy, or pride. Thus, they are morally “gray,” and like Wegener’s monster, Tolkien’s has often been depicted as gray in color to symbolize this amorality, most notably in Peter Jackson’s recent films. Continue reading Carl Boese & Paul Wegener – Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam aka The Golem: How He Came Into the World [+Extras] (1920)

Alfred Hitchcock – The Birds [+Extras] (1963)

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The story begins as an innocuous romantic triangle involving wealthy, spoiled Tippi Hedren, handsome Rod Taylor, and schoolteacher Suzanne Pleshette. The human story begins in a San Francisco pet shop and culminates at the home of Taylor’s mother (Jessica Tandy) at Bodega Bay, where the characters’ sense of security is slowly eroded by the curious behavior of the birds in the area. At first, it’s no more than a sea gull swooping down and pecking at Tippi’s head. Things take a truly ugly turn when hundreds of birds converge on a children’s party. There is never an explanation as to why the birds have run amok, but once the onslaught begins, there’s virtually no letup. Continue reading Alfred Hitchcock – The Birds [+Extras] (1963)

Alfred Hitchcock – Psycho (1960)

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from AllMovie
In 1960, Alfred Hitchcock was already famous as the screen’s master of suspense (and perhaps the best-known film director in the world) when he released Psycho and forever changed the shape and tone of the screen thriller. From its first scene, in which an unmarried couple balances pleasure and guilt in a lunchtime liaison in a cheap hotel (hardly a common moment in a major studio film in 1960), Psycho announced that it was taking the audience to places it had never been before, and on that score what followed would hardly disappoint. Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) is unhappy in her job at a Phoenix, Arizona real estate office and frustrated in her romance with hardware store manager Sam Loomis (John Gavin). One afternoon, Marion is given $40,000 in cash to be deposited in the bank. Minutes later, impulse has taken over and Marion takes off with the cash, hoping to leave Phoenix for good and start a new life with her purloined nest egg. 36 hours later, paranoia and exhaustion have started to set in, and Marion decides to stop for the night at the Bates Motel, where nervous but personable innkeeper Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins) cheerfully mentions that she’s the first guest in weeks, before he regales her with curious stories about his mother. There’s hardly a film fan alive who doesn’t know what happens next, but while the shower scene is justifiably the film’s most famous sequence, there are dozens of memorable bits throughout this film. Continue reading Alfred Hitchcock – Psycho (1960)

Carlos Enrique Taboada – El libro de piedra AKA The Book of Stone (1969)

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Plot Synopsis:
Julia is hired to be the governess of a young girl, Sylvia who has an emotionally distant father, Eugenio, and a new stepmother, Mariana. Sylvia insists that she plays with a little boy named Hugo – whom the adults all see is a stone statue in the courtyard. When strange things begin to happen (such as Mariana, whom Sylvia dislikes, experiencing strange pains) the adults begin to wonder if Hugo may be more than just an imaginary playmate. Continue reading Carlos Enrique Taboada – El libro de piedra AKA The Book of Stone (1969)