Hungary

Béla Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky – A londoni férfi AKA The Man from London (2007) (HD)

Synopsis
Maloin leads a simple life without prospects at the edge of the infinite sea; he barely notices the world around him, has already accepted the slow and inevitable deterioration of life around him and his all but complete loneliness.

When he becomes a witness to a murder, his life takes a sudden turn.

He comes face to face with issues of morality, sin, punishment, the line between innocence and complicity in a crime, and this state of scepsis leads him to the ontological question of the meaning and worth of existence. Read More »

Béla Tarr – Kárhozat AKA Damnation [Artificial Eye] (1988)

Quote:
Kárhozat is close to being a genre film in its story of love and betrayal, a theme that Tarr has described as being very simple—even “primitive.” Karrer lives a withdrawn life in a mining community where his evenings all end up in the Titanik bar. He is offered a smuggling job by the bar’s owner but passes it on to Sebestyén, husband of the singer at the bar. In Sebestyén’s absence, Karrer and the wife sleep together and Karrer seeks a lasting relationship. He considers denouncing Sebestyén to the police. On Sebestyén’s return, there is a confrontation between the two men and the bar owner takes the woman to his car, where they have sex. The next day, Karrer denounces them all. In the final scene, Karrer approaches a waste tip in the pouring rain where he confronts a barking dog. Getting down onto his hands and knees, he barks at it until it is forced into retreat. Read More »

Vatroslav Mimica – Tifusari AKA Typhoid Victims (1963)

The film was inspired by Jure Kaštelan’s famous war poem Tifusari. Aleksandar Marks’s woodcut-style drawings graphically depict hallucinations of sick partisans marching through wastelands. Read More »

Zoltán Huszárik – Szindbád AKA Sinbad (1971)

Quote:
Adapted from the short stories of Gyula Krúdy, a beloved Proustian author of the Magyars, Szindbád is an autumnal, reflective, and poetic film set during fin de siècle Hungary, and centers on a dying libertine’s thoughts and memories. Although named after the character in One Thousand and One Nights, Szindbad is more of a wilting Casanova. A womanizer and a gourmand, he both regrets and revels in his past pursuits of the flesh and stomach. Counter to the long shot, long take aesthetic that’s the default mode for European art cinema then and now, Huszárik—a graphic artist and painter as well—opts for montage editing. Haptic inserts, rich in sensuality and eroticism, of water droplets, globules of food oil, and blooming flowers, are counterpoised with the film’s melancholic tone channeled through Szindbád. A life lived purely for pleasure never seemed so gloomily romantic. Read More »

Márta Mészáros – Eltávozott nap AKA The girl aka The day has gone (1968)

A young woman leaves a state orphanage to find her mother in this interesting examination of
how the overt repression of women in the older pattern of village life has been replaced by
the more subtle sexual and economic exploitation inherent in the apparently freer existence
of young girls in the contemporary city. A key film from Marta Meszaros. Read More »

Ferenc Cakó – Stones AKA Kövek – Stones (2000)

An Artist violently grinds stones and uses the sand to create animated drawings. His first picture is the Garden of Eden. Once Eve becomes pregnant, all the tribulations of the real world are unleashed upon her. She follows through dream-like sequences populated with crying birds, brick-wall-faced bureaucrats and pensive philosophers in seemingly petrified poses. Irritated, repressed and allured by each other, the creatures on the screen start living a life of their own. Gradually, a dark climax builds up. Will the Artist himself be able to handle so much emotional intensity? Written by helge79 Read More »

Márta Mészáros – Napló szerelmeimnek AKA Diary for my lovers (1987)

Wikipedia wrote:
Diary for My Lovers (Hungarian: Napló szerelmeimnek) is a 1987 Hungarian drama film directed by Márta Mészáros. It was entered into the 37th Berlin International Film Festival, where it won the Silver Bear for an outstanding single achievement. Read More »