Hungary

István Bródy – Dódi karrierje AKA Dodi’s Career (1916)

Adolf Fauler asks Elsa out in a letter. Mr Braun, Elsa’s father, finds the letter and finds the pair in flagranti in the park. Next day Adolf visits the father who gives him his blessings and even a job… Read More »

Antalffy Sándor – A kis lord AKA The Little Lord (1918)

Quote:
The outskirts of New York: Cedrik Errol, 8 years old, lives in miserable conditions with his widowed mother. Refined features, charming demeanour, and always neatly dressed, he earns the nickname “The Little Lord.” One day a lawyer comes saying he is the grandson (and only heir) of Lord Fauntleroy. Cedric travels to England and quickly gets friendly with the grumpy old gentleman. Read More »

László Vitézy – Vörös föld AKA Red Earth (1982)

A miner finds bauxite near his village, close to the surface. He thinks he has found his fortune, but thanks to the Hungarian bureaucracy, he actually found nothing but trouble. Read More »

Zoltán Fábri – Életjel AKA Fourteen Lives Saved (1954)

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September 1952 in a mine in Northern-Hungary after an explosion water breaks in from the neighbouring shaft and fourteen miners become trapped. The whole country unites to save them. Read More »

György Révész – Utazás a koponyám körül AKA Trip Around My Cranium (1970)

Quote:
A thoroughly original, delightful comedy with serious undertones, this film is based upon the writings of a famous Hungarian journalist, Frigyes Karinthy. Karinthy, who, in his later years, suddenly became afflicted with a brain tumor, wrote a humorous novel about his thoughts during his illness. A Journey Around My Skull is not only a description of the illness and the great medical adventure of the writer, a strange, constantly unbalanced manner of life, but blends in several characteristics of Karinthy’s earlier works. The writer (played by Latinovits, who won the Best Actor Award at the recent San Sebastian Film Festival for his role here) is placed in pre-war Budapest, during the 1930s, and, while seated in his favorite cafe one day, he hears the roaring of trains. Read More »

Béla Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky – A londoni férfi AKA The Man From London (2007)

Quote:

After witnessing a crime during his night shift as railway switchman near the docks, a man finds a briefcase full of money. While he and his family step up their living standards, others start looking for the disappeared case.

Sight and Sound wrote:

Béla Tarr’s latest film may initially appear to be his most conventional work to date, but the Hungarian director hasn’t softened his uncompromising worldview in ‘The Man from London’.By Michael Brooke

The extinction of the aesthetically and intellectually rigorous European art film has been predicted for so long (in the early 1980s, a Sight & Sound columnist called for the creation of a Society for the Protection of the Art Movie) that the mere fact of Hungarian auteur Béla Tarr continuing to direct films without making the smallest concession to popular fashion is a cause for celebration. Read More »

János Kovácsi – Cha-Cha-Cha (1982)

Gruber is a normal 16-year-old growing up in Budapest in 1962, but he has a problem – how does he get to know the opposite sex? At the Sunday afternoon dance classes the young “ladies and gentlemen” hold each other while dancing, and that makes the lessons worth something. Otherwise, the pianist’s attention wanders and the orchestra does not exactly play with a single-minded dedication. In fact, everybody seems to have other things on their minds, except for the enthusiastic dance instructor and his ever-smiling assistant. Letterboxd Read More »