Iran

Naser Taghvai – Daii jan Napelon AKA My Uncle Napoleon (1976)

An uproarious adoption of a popular novel by Iraj Pezeshkzad set in and around the family compound in early 1940s Tehran, marvelously rich in personality and incident. The title character, so-called because of his constant invocation of the general, rules over a wonderfully complex extended family. A hilarious series which makes fun of just about everything. Read More »

Mohammad Hossein Latifi – Khabgah-e dokhtaran AKA Girl’s Dormitory (2004)

A group of college students move into a dilapidated dormitory that is reputed by local people to be haunted.

From Horror.com:
The history of horror films being made in Iran goes back to the 1950’s when the late directory Samuel Khachikian cranked out titles like “A Party in Hell” (1956), “The Midnight Terror” (1961) and “Delirium” (1965). Over the years since, the horror genre in Iran has had its up and downs. One thing has remained constant, though, many Iranian movie fans welcome the chance to see domestically produced fright films. Read More »

Mani Haghighi – Ejdeha Vared Mishavad! AKA A Dragon Arrives! (2016)

Quote:
An orange Chevrolet Impala drives across a cemetery towards an abandoned shipwreck in the middle of a desert landscape. It is the 22nd of January, 1965. The day before, the Iranian prime minister was shot dead in front of the parliament building. Read More »

Marva Nabili – Khake Sar Beh Morh AKA The Sealed Soil (1977)

Quote:
Made surreptitiously in 1977 just as the Ayatollah Khomeini regime was coming to power, a rough cut of ‘The Sealed Soil” was smuggled out of Iran by the director in a false-bottomed suitcase, and taken to the U.S., where che completed her final cut. The film has never been seen in Iran Read More »

Mehdi Fard Ghaderi – Tanavob AKA Alternation (2005)

Quote:
A stealing happens on a train and it is shown from the perspective of each passenger. Read More »

Abbas Kiarostami – Zendegi Va Digar Hich aka And Life Goes On (1991)

SYNOPSIS
On a chaotic and congested highway toll interchange, an off-camera toll clerk listens impassively to a humanitarian public service radio broadcast from a Red Crescent spokesperson urging listeners to consider adoption of the many children who have been left orphaned as a result of the recent devastating earthquake in northern Iran. An unnamed, middle-aged film director (Farhad Kheradmand) stops at the tollbooth and inquires about the condition of the main road to Rudbar, having been turned back a day earlier at the intermediate town of Manjil due to the impassability of the route. Accompanied by his son Puya (Puya Pievar), the director is hoping to reach the village of Koker in search of the Ahmadpour brothers: two boys who had appeared in his film, Where is the Friend’s House? (a self-reference to Abbas Kiarostami’s earlier film). Read More »

Unknown – The Frozen Rose (2003)

Quote:
This is a Iranian short film named “The Frozen Rose”. Its story is an excerpt from the movie Khodahafez Rafik meaning Goodbye my Friend (2003) which includes three mini stories. This story is about a young girl named Rukkayah and her deep desire to see her father again who had already been martyred on the frontlines during the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988). We see at the beginning that when the train which carries Iranian soldiers stops, this little girl is the only one who stands in the same position until the other children move away after having sold their flowers to the soldiers. Every morning she cuts flowers and offers them to the soldier who will be martyred without taking their worth in return. The end of this movie is very powerful and moving. In essence, the whole story relies on the fact that Rukkayah hasn’t accepted that her father has passed away 2 years ago. Read More »